Graphic Design

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  • Hello Avatar: Rise of the Networked Generation

    Hello Avatar: Rise of the Networked Generation

    Sert Kapak
    Hello Avatar! Or, {llSay(0, "Hello, Avatar!"); is a tiny piece of user-friendly code that allows us to program our virtual selves. In Hello Avatar, B. Coleman examines a crucial aspect of our cultural shift from analog to digital: the continuum between online and off-, what she calls the "x-reality" that crosses between the virtual and the real. She looks at the emergence of a world that is neither virtual nor real but encompasses a multiplicity of network combinations. And she argues that it is the role of the avatar to help us express our new agency--our new power to customize our networked life. By avatar, Coleman means not just the animated figures that populate our screens but the gestalt of images, text, and multimedia that make up our online identities--in virtual worlds like Second Life and in the form of email, video chat, and other digital artifacts. Exploring such network activities as embodiment, extreme (virtual) violence, and the work in virtual reality labs, and offering sidebar interviews with designers and practitioners, she argues that what is new is real-time collaboration and copresence, the way we make connections using networked media and the cultures we have created around this. The star of this drama of expanded horizons is the networked subject--all of us who represent aspects of ourselves and our work across the mediascape.
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  • Nudging Graphic Design (Emigre, No. 66)

    Nudging Graphic Design (Emigre, No. 66)

    Karton Kapak
    Kenneth FitzGerald proposes that the objective of design, to create a class of expert professional practitioners, can - and should - only lead to its demise as a specialist profession.Lorraine Wild and Sam Potts respond, separately, to the publication of Rick Poynor's recent book "No More Rules: Graphic Design and Postmodernism."Eric Heiman urges designers to "think wrong" and refocus their creative energies to solving non-commercial, more socially motivated problems.Jeffery Keedy gives us a list of some of the most popular but dumb ideas in design.Ben Hagon warns that without a significant change in the method by which we create work, Joe Client will, in time, do our graphic design work for us.Kali Nikitas and Louise Sandhaus respond to the criticism levelled at their conversation "Visitations" which was published in Emigre #64.And Emigre interviews Armin Vit, the founder of Speak Up, design's most successful blog, and David Cabianca who discusses the value of design theory and criticism.Plus, the Readers Respond, featuring letters from around the world in response to past issues of Emigre magazine.
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