Administration & Medicine Economics

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  • End-of-Life Decision Making: A Cross-National Study (Basic Bioethics)

    This examination of end-of-life decision making offers a broader perspective than that found in the extensive existing literature on this topic by offering a cross-national comparison. Experts from twelve countries analyze death-related issues and policies in their respective nations, discussing such topics as health care costs, advance directives or wills, pain management, and cultural, social, and religious factors. The countries selected for study -- Brazil, China, Germany, India, Israel, Japan, Kenya, the Netherlands, Taiwan, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States -- represent a mix of East and West, developed and developing nations seldom considered together in analyses of these issues. This is the first systematic attempt to analyze end-of-life issues in many of these countries; the chapters on China, Kenya (of special significance because of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa) and Turkey break new ground.Each author reports on various factors in end-of-life decisions: estimated costs of dying, including health care costs; the proportion of deaths occurring in hospitals, in hospices, and at home; the prevalence and variety of advance directives; the mix of high technology and palliative care; the cut-off point for aggressive care and the legal definition of death; government policies on end-of-life decisions, assisted suicide, and euthanasia; and cultural, social, and religious influences. The findings show that there are great differences among countries even in the way these issues are framed. Scholars, policymakers, and medical practitioners can all benefit from the extensive information in these essays on how different nations are dealing with death-related issues.
    14,11  TL83,00  TL
  • Contagion and the State in Europe, 1830-1930

    Karton Kapak
    This book explains the historical reasons for the divergence in public health policies adopted in Britain, France, Germany and Sweden, and the spectrum of responses to the threat of contagious diseases such as cholera, smallpox and syphilis. In particular the book examines the link between politics and prevention, and uses medical history to illuminate broader questions of the development of statutory intervention and the comparative and divergent evolution of the modern state in Europe.
    32,08  TL97,20  TL
  • Fresh Medicine: How to Fix Reform and Build a Sustainable Health Care System

    Karton Kapak
    Last spring, after congress passed sweeping legislation to reform our nation’s health care system, the editorial board of the New York Times wrote: “Just as Social Security grew from a modest start in 1935 to become a bedrock of the nation’s retirement system, this is a start on health care reform, not the end . . . The process has finally begun.” One of the key voices in that process will be Philip Bredesen, who served as governor of Tennessee from 2003-2011. In Fresh Medicine—the first book to address this reform—Bredesen delivers a concise, intelligent analysis of what the reform is, how it is flawed and why we have to fix it.
    14,85  TL32,29  TL
  • Health Informatics: A Patient-Centered Approach to Diabetes

    Sert Kapak
    The healthcare industry has been slow to join the information technology revolution; handwritten records are still the primary means of organizing patient care. Concerns about patient privacy, the difficulty of developing appropriate computing tools and information technology, high costs, and the resistance of some physicians and nurses have hampered the use of technology in health care. In 2009, the U.S. government committed billions of dollars to health care technology. Many questions remain, however, about how to deploy these resources. In Health Informatics, experts in technology, joined by clinicians, use diabetes--a costly, complex, and widespread disease that involves nearly every facet of the health care system--to examine the challenges of using the tools of information technology to improve patient care. Unlike other books on medical informatics that discuss such topics as computerized order entry and digital medical records, Health Informatics focuses on the patient, charting the information problems patients encounter in different stages of the disease. [Chapters discuss ubiquitous computing as a tool to move diabetes care out of the doctor's office, technology and chronic disease management, educational gaming as a way to help patients understand their disease, patient access to information, and methodological and theoretical concerns.] We need both technologists and providers at the drawing board in order to design and deploy effective digital tools for health care. This book examines and exemplifies this necessary collaboration.
    37,15  TL86,40  TL
  • The Age of Anxiety: A History of America's Turbulent Affair with Tranquilizers

    The Age of Anxiety: A History of America's Turbulent Affair with Tranquilizers

    Sert Kapak
    Anxious Americans have increasingly pursued peace of mind through pills and prescriptions. In 2006, the National Institute of Mental Health estimated that 40 million adult Americans suffer from an anxiety disorder in any given year: more than double the number thought to have such a disorder in 2001. Anti-anxiety drugs are a billion-dollar business. Yet as recently as 1955, when the first tranquilizer—Miltown—went on the market, pharmaceutical executives worried that there wouldn’t be interest in anxiety-relief. At mid-century, talk therapy remained the treatment of choice.But Miltown became a sensation—the first psychotropic blockbuster in United States history. By 1957, Americans had filled 36 million prescriptions. Patients seeking made-to-order tranquility emptied drugstores, forcing pharmacists to post signs reading “more Miltown tomorrow.” The drug’s financial success and cultural impact revolutionized perceptions of anxiety and its treatment, inspiring the development of other lifestyle drugs including Valium and Prozac.In The Age of Anxiety, Andrea Tone draws on a broad array of original sources—manufacturers’ files, FDA reports, letters, government investigations, and interviews with inventors, physicians, patients, and activists—to provide the first comprehensive account of the rise of America’s tranquilizer culture. She transports readers from the bomb shelters of the Cold War to the scientific optimism of the Baby Boomers, to the “just say no” Puritanism of the late 1970s and 1980s.A vibrant history of America’s long and turbulent affair with tranquilizers, The Age of Anxiety casts new light on what it has meant to seek synthetic solutions to everyday angst.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • A Death Retold: Jesica Santillan, the Bungled Transplant, and Paradoxes of Medical Citizenship (Studies in Social Medicine)

    A Death Retold: Jesica Santillan, the Bungled Transplant, and Paradoxes of Medical Citizenship (Studies in Social Medicine)

    In February 2003, an undocumented immigrant teen from Mexico lay dying in a prominent American hospital due to a stunning medical oversight—she had received a heart-lung transplantation of the wrong blood type. In the following weeks, Jesica Santillan's tragedy became a portal into the complexities of American medicine, prompting contentious debate about new patterns and old problems in immigration, the hidden epidemic of medical error, the lines separating transplant "haves" from "have-nots," the right to sue, and the challenges posed by "foreigners" crossing borders for medical care.This volume draws together experts in history, sociology, medical ethics, communication and immigration studies, transplant surgery, anthropology, and health law to understand the dramatic events, the major players, and the core issues at stake. Contributors view the Santillan story as a morality tale: about the conflicting values underpinning American health care; about the politics of transplant medicine; about how a nation debates deservedness, justice, and second chances; and about the global dilemmas of medical tourism and citizenship.Contributors:Charles Bosk, University of PennsylvaniaLeo R. Chavez, University of California, IrvineRichard Cook, University of ChicagoThomas Diflo, New York University Medical CenterJason Eberl, Indiana University-Purdue University IndianapolisJed Adam Gross, Yale UniversityJacklyn Habib, American Association of Retired PersonsTyler R. Harrison, Purdue UniversityBeatrix Hoffman, Northern Illinois UniversityNancy M. P. King, University of North Carolina at Chapel HillBarron Lerner, Columbia University Mailman School of Public HealthSusan E. Lederer, Yale UniversityJulie Livingston, Rutgers UniversityEric M. Meslin, Indiana University School of Medicine and Indiana University-Purdue University IndianapolisSusan E. Morgan, Purdue UniversityNancy Scheper-Hughes, University of California, BerkeleyRosamond Rhodes, Mount Sinai School of Medicine and The Graduate Center, City University of New YorkCarolyn Rouse, Princeton UniversityKaren Salmon, New England School of LawLesley Sharp, Barnard and Columbia University Mailman School of Public HealthLisa Volk Chewning, Rutgers UniversityKeith Wailoo, Rutgers University
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • Ginseng and Aspirin: Healthcare Alternatives for Aging Chinese in New York (Anthropology of Contemporary Issues)

    Ginseng and Aspirin: Healthcare Alternatives for Aging Chinese in New York (Anthropology of Contemporary Issues)

    Navigating the maze of modern American health care is rarely easy; those who enter it are confronted with a dizzying array of specialists, practitioners, and clinics from which to choose, and are forced to make decisions regarding drugs and treatments about which they may know very little. For immigrants, finding their way can be difficult—especially for those to whom Western medicine is itself unfamiliar.In this engaging, accessible, and detail-rich book, Zibin Guo narrates elderly Chinese immigrants' response to contemporary American medicine. Traditional Chinese medicine emphasizes self-care and the medicinal value of foods and herbs; American doctors' responses to the ailments of their Chinese patients can seem impersonal and unnecessarily interventionist. Distrust, expense, and problems of communication and interpretation often frustrate both patient and practitioner.Guo paints a picture of a population that, despite its outward appearance of homogeneity, demonstrates a surprisingly wide variety of health-care knowledge, practice, and belief. Using case materials and interviews, he analyzes the blend of folk treatments and respect for Western science that coexist in the health care regimens of these elderly Chinese immigrants.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • Targeting Autism: What We Know, Don't Know, and Can Do to Help Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Targeting Autism: What We Know, Don't Know, and Can Do to Help Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Karton Kapak
    Targeting Autism reaches out to everyone who lives with or cares about a young child with autism. First published in 1998 and updated in 2002, author Shirley Cohen has recast this best seller throughout to chart the dynamics of the autism world in the first years of the twenty-first century. In this expanded edition she provides specifics about the new developments that have modified the map of the world of autism or that may do so in the near future.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • The Corporate Practice of Medicine: Competition and Innovation in Health Care

    The Corporate Practice of Medicine: Competition and Innovation in Health Care

    Karton Kapak
    One of the country's leading health economists presents a provocative analysis of the transformation of American medicine from a system of professional dominance to an industry under corporate control. James Robinson examines the economic and political forces that have eroded the traditional medical system of solo practice and fee-for-service insurance, hindered governmental regulation, and invited the market competition and organizational innovations that now are under way. The trend toward health care corporatization is irreversible, he says, and it parallels analogous trends toward privatization in the world economy.The physician is the key figure in health care, and how physicians are organized is central to the health care system, says Robinson. He focuses on four forms of physician organization to illustrate how external pressures have led to health care innovations: multispecialty medical groups, Independent Practice Associations (IPAs), physician practice management firms, and physician-hospital organizations. These physician organizations have evolved in the past two decades by adopting from the larger corporate sector similar forms of ownership, governance, finance, compensation, and marketing.In applying economic principles to the maelstrom of health care, Robinson highlights the similarities between competition and consolidation in medicine and in other sectors of the economy. He points to hidden costs in fee-for-service medicine—overtreatment, rampant inflation, uncritical professional dominance regarding treatment decisions—factors often overlooked when newer organizational models are criticized.Not everyone will share Robinson's appreciation for market competition and corporate organization in American health care, but he challenges those who would return to the inefficient and inequitable era of medicine from which we've just emerged. Forcefully written and thoroughly documented, The Corporate Practice of Medicine presents a thoughtful—and optimistic—view of a future health care system, one in which physician entrepreneurship is a dynamic component.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • Ageing, Health, and Productivity: The Economics of Increased Life Expectancy

    Ageing, Health, and Productivity: The Economics of Increased Life Expectancy

    Sert Kapak
    Increase in life expectancy is arguably the most remarkable by-product of modern economic growth. In the last 30 years we have gained roughly 2.5 years of longevity every decade, both in Europe and the United States. Successfully managing aging and longevity over the next twenty years is one of the major structural challenges faced by policy makers in advanced economies, particularly in health spending, social security administration, and labor market institutions. This book looks closely into those challenges and identifies the fundamental issues at both the macroeconomic and microeconomic level.The first half of the book studies the macroeconomic relationships between health spending, technological progress in medical related sectors, economic growth, and welfare state reforms. In the popular press, longevity and population ageing are typically perceived as a tremendous burden. However, with a proper set of reforms, advanced economies have the option of transforming the enormous challenge posed by longevity into a long term opportunity to boost aggregate outcomes. The basic prerequisite of a healthy ageing scenario is a substantial structural reform in social security and in labor market institutions. The second part of the book looks closely into the microeconomic relationship between population aging and productivity, both at the individual and at the firm level. There is surprisingly little research on such key questions. The book contributes to this debate in two ways. It presents a detailed analysis of the determinants of productivity, with a focus on both the long-run historical evolution and the cross sectional changes. It also uses econometric analysis to look into the determinants of the various dimensions of individual productivity. The volume concludes that the complex relationship between population ageing and longevity is not written in stone, and can be modified by properly designed choices.
    Temin Edilemiyor