Foreign & International Law

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17 öğeden 1-16 arası gösteriliyor.
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  • Underground Economies and Illegal Imports: Legal and Business Strategies to Address Illegitimate Commerce

    Karton Kapak
    Underground Economies and Illegal Imports: Business and Legal Strategies to Address Illegal Commerce is a unique resource for lawyers and their clients facing the chaotic landscape of illegal trade in the black and gray markets, where legal remedies are often unobtainable or impracticable. Donald E. deKieffer-a practitioner who has represented more than 60 Fortune 500 companies both in the US and abroad-provides clear descriptions of how international supply and distribution chains are attacked by clever and not-so-subtle thieves around the world. This book is also a helpful source of examples and instructions on how to prepare for these attacks, and the best remedies when they do occur.Underground Economies and Illegal Imports: Business and Legal Strategies to Address Illegal Commerce is a one-of-a-kind guide to the underside of international trade for businesses, law enforcement and policy-makers. The illicit dealers in legitimate (or not-so-legitimate) merchandise are often linked with transnational criminal elements and even terrorists. This book assists international traders in avoiding these problems, or ameliorating any effects.
    48,76  TL487,62  TL
  • Competition Policy and Law in China, Hong Kong and Taiwan

    Sert Kapak
    This book comprehensively examines competition policy and law in Greater China--the People's Republic, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. The evolution of pro-competition policies in each jurisdiction is traced in the context of international developments in competition policy adoption by developing and transitional economies as well as the advocacy of competition adoption by the following international organizations- WTO, OECD, UNCTAD, the World Bank and the IMF. A theoretical explanation of the observed developments concludes that successful competition policy adoption is unlikely to succeed, without a functioning democratic system.
    34,56  TL345,60  TL
  • Design for a New Europe

    Karton Kapak
    How did the process of European integration break down; how can it be repaired? In European Integration, 1950-2003, John Gillingham reviewed the history of the European project and predicted the rejection of the European constitution. Now the world's leading expert on the EU maps out a route to save the Union. The four chapters of this penetrating, fiercely-argued and often witty book subject today's dysfunctional European Union to critical scrutiny in an attempt to show how it is stunting economic growth, sapping the vitality of national governments, and undermining competitiveness. It explains how the attempt to revive the EU by turning it into a champion of research and development will backfire and demonstrates how Europe's great experiment in political and economic union can succeed only if the wave of liberal reform now under way in the historically downtrodden east is allowed to sweep away the prosperous and complacent west.
    21,04  TL65,74  TL
  • The English Historical Constitution: Continuity, Change and European Effects

    Karton Kapak
    The fundamental legal and institutional changes of recent decades have brought the English constitution into question. Accompanying issues have been the extent to which its traditional character and main features have been changed, lost their former appeal and retained their distinctness in the European Union. These issues are not readily addressed in everyday thinking about a constitution simply conceived as unwritten or in constitutional accounts variously preoccupied with abstract analysis, political accountability or transcendent norms. The English Historical Constitution addresses these issues by developing a historical constitutional approach and thus elaborating on continuity and change in the constitution's main doctrines and institutions. From an English legal perspective, it offers a complement or corrective to analytical, political and normative approaches by reforming an old conception of the historical constitution and of its history, partly obscured and long neglected through the modern analytical preoccupation with its law as an abstract scheme of rules, principles and practices.
    34,13  TL97,52  TL
  • Ideals and Realities of Regional Integration in the Muslim World: The Case of the Economic Cooperation Organization

    Ideals and Realities of Regional Integration in the Muslim World: The Case of the Economic Cooperation Organization

    Sert Kapak
    This is a case study of the Economic Cooperation Organization (ECO). It argues that the ECO region has all the necessary elements for regional integration, however, the ECO has not yet reached its goals due to a postponement of its strategic, political and security decisions and the lack of a common denominator of identity and interests. The argument reinforces the notion that regionalism is not only an economic decision but also a political one which may yield economic dividends to the member states. The book explains the general theoretical nexus between regionalism and security in some of the more successful and well-known regional formations. Then it goes in depth to discuss the political economy and history of the ECO and its various ties with the West. It stresses the political and security decisions needed to mobilize the ECOs resources and improve its efficacy, and analyses regional security of the both the southern and the northern tiers of the ECO in detail, focusing particularly on the situation in Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • A Certain Idea of Europe (Cornell Studies in Political Economy)

    A Certain Idea of Europe (Cornell Studies in Political Economy)

    The quasi-federal European Union stands out as the major exception in the thinly institutionalized world of international politics. Something has led Europeans—and only Europeans—beyond the nation-state to a fundamentally new political architecture. Craig Parsons argues in A Certain Idea of Europe that this "something" was a particular set of ideas generated in Western Europe after the Second World War. In Parsons's view, today's European Union reflects the ideological (and perhaps visionary) project of an elite minority. His book traces the progressive victory of this project in France, where the battle over European institutions erupted most divisively. Drawing on archival research and extensive interviews with French policymakers, the author carefully traces a fifty-year conflict between radically different European plans. Only through aggressive leadership did the advocates of a supranational "community" Europe succeed at building the EU and binding their opponents within it. Parsons puts the causal impact of ideas, and their binding effects through institutions, at the center of his book. In so doing he presents a strong logic of "social construction"—a sharp departure from other accounts of EU history that downplay the role of ideas and ideology.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • A Certain Idea of Europe (Cornell Studies in Political Economy)

    A Certain Idea of Europe (Cornell Studies in Political Economy)

    The quasi-federal European Union stands out as the major exception in the thinly institutionalized world of international politics. Something has led Europeans—and only Europeans—beyond the nation-state to a fundamentally new political architecture. Craig Parsons argues in A Certain Idea of Europe that this "something" was a particular set of ideas generated in Western Europe after the Second World War. In Parsons's view, today's European Union reflects the ideological (and perhaps visionary) project of an elite minority. His book traces the progressive victory of this project in France, where the battle over European institutions erupted most divisively. Drawing on archival research and extensive interviews with French policymakers, the author carefully traces a fifty-year conflict between radically different European plans. Only through aggressive leadership did the advocates of a supranational "community" Europe succeed at building the EU and binding their opponents within it. Parsons puts the causal impact of ideas, and their binding effects through institutions, at the center of his book. In so doing he presents a strong logic of "social construction"—a sharp departure from other accounts of EU history that downplay the role of ideas and ideology.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • The European Union: Politics and Policies

    The European Union: Politics and Policies

    Karton Kapak
    Already one of the best and most widely used introductions to the politics and policies of the European Union, this new edition of John McCormick's book brings the remarkable story of European integration up to date. Retaining the familiar three-part structure - covering the history, governing institutions and policies of the EU - it shows its readers how the EU has become one of the world's economic and political superpowers. It explains how the efforts to build a single market have had far-reaching effects that have changed the lives of Europeans in many different and often unexpected ways, and have helped the 15 individual member states to take a newly-assertive role on the global stage. Thoroughly revised and updated, with many new tables, figures and boxes, the third edition takes into account the following important changes: the effects of the treaties of Amsterdam and Nice the conversion to the euro in early 2002 the conclusions of the EU's constitutional convention the implications of eastern enlargement developments on the common foreign and security policy Characterized by McCormick's clear and engaging style of writing, The European Union: Politics and Policies avoids the bureaucratic and legal jargon that colors so many other studies of this important political and economic actor. It is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand how the EU works, and how it has impacted the lives of 380 million Europeans.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • A Critical Introduction to European Law (Law in Context)

    A Critical Introduction to European Law (Law in Context)

    Karton Kapak
    Written by one of the leading academics specialising in European law and legal theory, A Critical Introduction to European Law , first published in 2009, explains the history and institutional framework of European Union law to students and scholars. Through the inclusion of commentaries on successive drafts of the Constitutional and Lisbon treaties, and discussion of recent developments such as the Turkish application, this third edition explores the evolving role of the EU in international and global politics. A consciously interdisciplinary approach, which draws on a variety of materials from political and legal thought, social theory, economic analysis, literature, history and cultural studies, is deployed to make the present state of Union law comprehensible.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • The Dynamics of International Law

    The Dynamics of International Law

    Karton Kapak
    Paul F. Diehl and Charlotte Ku's new framework for international law divides it into operating and normative systems. The authors provide a theory of how these two systems interact, which explains how changes in one system precipitate changes and create capacity in the other. A punctuated equilibrium theory of system evolution, drawn from studies of biology and public policy studies, provides the basis for delineating the conditions for change and helps explain a pattern of international legal change that is often infrequent and sub-optimal, but still influential.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • One Nation Under Surveillance: A New Social Contract to Defend Freedom Without Sacrificing Liberty

    One Nation Under Surveillance: A New Social Contract to Defend Freedom Without Sacrificing Liberty

    Sert Kapak
    What limits, if any, should be placed on a government's efforts to spy on its citizens in the name of national security? Spying on foreigners has long been regarded as an unseemly but necessary enterprise. Spying on one's own citizens in a democracy, by contrast, has historically been subject to various forms of legal and political restraint. For most of the twentieth century these regimes were kept distinct. That position is no longer tenable. Modern threats do not respect national borders. Changes in technology make it impractical to distinguish between 'foreign' and 'local' communications. And our culture is progressively reducing the sphere of activity that citizens can reasonably expect to be kept from government eyes.The main casualty of this transformed environment will be privacy. Recent battles over privacy have been dominated by fights over warrantless electronic surveillance or CCTV; the coming years will see debates over DNA databases, data mining, and biometric identification. There will be protests and lawsuits, editorials and elections resisting these attacks on privacy. Those battles are worthy. But the war will be lost. Modern threats increasingly require that governments collect such information, governments are increasingly able to collect it, and citizens increasingly accept that they will collect it.One Nation Under Surveillance proposes a move away from questions of whether governments should collect information and onto more problematic and relevant questions concerning its use. By reframing the relationship between privacy and security in the language of a social contract, mediated by a citizenry who are active participants rather than passive targets, this book offers a framework to defend freedom without sacrificing liberty.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • International Territorial Administration: How Trusteeship and the Civilizing Mission Never Went Away

    International Territorial Administration: How Trusteeship and the Civilizing Mission Never Went Away

    Karton Kapak
    Trusteeship and the civilizing mission in international relations did not end with the emergence of the self-determination entitlement that led to decolonization in the second half of the 20th century. International organizations, whose modern form emerged during the height of colonialism, took on the 'civilizing' role in the 'post-colonial' era, internationalizing trusteeship and re-legitimizing it as a feature of international public policy into the bargain. Through analysis of the history of and purposes associated with the involvement of international organizations in territorial administration, such as the UN missions in Kosovo and East Timor, a comparison between this activity and colonial trusteeship, the Mandate and Trusteeship arrangements, and an exploration of the modern ideas of international law and public policy that underpin and legitimize contemporary interventions, this book relates a new history of the concept of international trusteeship. From British colonialist Lord Lugard's 'dual mandate' to the 'state-building' agenda of the High Representative in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Lord Ashdown, wide-ranging links between the complex peace operations of today and the civilizing mission of the colonial era are established, offering a historical, political, and legal framework within which the legitimacy of, and challenges faced by, complex interventions can be appraised. This new history of international trusteeship raises important questions about the role of international law and organizations in facilitating relations of dominations and tutelage, and suggests that the contemporary significance of the self-determination entitlement needs to be re-evaluated.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • The European Company (Law Practitioner Series) (Volume 2)

    The European Company (Law Practitioner Series) (Volume 2)

    The European Company ('SE') is a legal entity offering a European perspective for businesses. Its purpose is to allow businesses that wish to extend their activities beyond their home Member State to operate throughout the EU on the basis of one set of rules and a unified management system. The book explains how to set up and organise a European Company, as well as setting out the text of the EC instruments (a Regulation and a Directive) serving as its legal basis, and a list of national implementing laws. This second volume reports on the countries which have legislated during 2005 and 2006. Divided into two sections, it first offers critical review of the usefulness of, and the opportunities presented by, this new vehicle; analyses the Regulation and the Directive; and examines the tax aspects of the SE. The second part reports on each of the Member States.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • Aggression and Crimes Against Peace (Philosophical and Legal Aspectrs of War and Conflict)

    Aggression and Crimes Against Peace (Philosophical and Legal Aspectrs of War and Conflict)

    Karton Kapak
    In this volume, the third in his trilogy on the philosophical and legal aspects of war and conflict, Larry May locates a normative grounding for the crime of aggression-the only one of the three crimes charged at Nuremberg that is not currently being prosecuted-that is similar to that for crimes against humanity and war crimes. He considers cases from the Nuremberg trials, philosophical debates in the Just War tradition, and more recent debates about the International Criminal Court, as well as the hard cases of humanitarian intervention and terrorist aggression. May argues that crimes of aggression, sometimes called crimes against peace, deserve international prosecution when one State undermines the ability of another State to protect human rights. His thesis refutes the traditional understanding of aggression, which often has been interpreted as a crossing of borders by one sovereign state into another sovereign state. At Nuremberg, crimes against humanity charges were only pursued if the defendant also engaged in the crime of aggression. May argues for a reversal of this position, contending that aggression charges should be pursued only if the defendant's acts involve serious human rights violations.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • Striking First: Preemption and Prevention in International Conflict (University Center for Human Values)

    Striking First: Preemption and Prevention in International Conflict (University Center for Human Values)

    Sert Kapak
    Does the United States have the right to defend itself by striking first, or must it wait until an attack is in progress? Is the Bush Doctrine of aggressive preventive action a justified and legal recourse against threats posed by terrorists and rogue states? Tackling one of the most controversial policy issues of the post-September 11 world, Michael Doyle argues that neither the Bush Doctrine nor customary international law is capable of adequately responding to the pressing security threats of our times. In Striking First, Doyle shows how the Bush Doctrine has consistently disregarded a vital distinction in international law between acts of preemption in the face of imminent threats and those of prevention in the face of the growing offensive capability of an enemy. Taking a close look at the Iraq war, the 1998 attack against al Qaeda in Afghanistan, and the Cuban Missile Crisis, among other conflicts, he contends that international law must rely more completely on United Nations Charter procedures and develop clearer standards for dealing with lethal but not immediate threats. After explaining how the UN can again play an important role in enforcing international law and strengthening international guidelines for responding to threats, he describes the rare circumstances when unilateral action is indeed necessary. Based on the 2006 Tanner Lectures at Princeton University, Striking First includes responses by distinguished political theorists Richard Tuck and Jeffrey McMahan and international law scholar Harold Koh, yielding a lively debate that will redefine how--and for what reasons--tomorrow's wars are fought.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • The Fate of Young Democracies

    The Fate of Young Democracies

    Karton Kapak
    In this book, Kapstein and Converse make use of a unique data base of all democratizations since 1960 to explore the reasons for backsliding and reversal in the world's fledgling democracies. Unlike an earlier generation of scholarship, which argued that poor economic performance was the major cause of democratic collapse, Kapstein and Converse find that the core of the problem lies with poor institutional design. The recent backlash against democracy in such countries as Bolivia, Venezuela, Russia, and Georgia poses renewed concerns about the viability of this regime type in the developing world. Drawing on a unique data set of every democratization episode since 1960, this book explores the underlying reasons for backsliding and reversal in the world's fledgling democracies and offers some proposals with respect to what the international community might do to help these states stay on track toward political stability. Rejecting earlier scholarship on this topic, which focused on poor economic performance as the leading cause of democratic reversal, Kapstein and Converse argue that the core of the problem is found in the weak institutions that have been built in much of the developing world, which encourage leaders to abuse their power. Understanding the underlying reasons for democratic failure is essential if we are to offer policy recommendations that have any hope of making a difference on the ground.
    Temin Edilemiyor