Internet & Web Culture

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  • Was wir heute wissen müssen: Von der Informationsflut zum Bildungsgut

    Karton Kapak
    Die Welt des Wissens – und wie wir sie in den Kopf bekommenWer heute Wissen sucht, hat Möglichkeiten wie noch nie: Von Bibliotheken bis zum Internet, vom Fernsehen bis zum Hörbuch, von Studienreisen bis zum Science Center – überall werden massenhaft Informationen angeboten. Doch wie findet man sich in diesem riesigen Angebot zurecht? Und welches Wissen braucht der Mensch überhaupt, um die komplexe Gegenwart zu bewältigen? Gemeinsam mit renommierten Wissens-Experten geben SPIEGEL-Redakteure Antworten auf diese und viele andere Bildungsfragen. Kompakt und unterhaltsam präsentieren sie, was man heute über die Themengebiete Politik, Geschichte, Naturwissenschaften, Wirtschaft, Kultur und im Alltag wissen sollte, wie und wo man am besten neues Wissen erwirbt und was beim Lernen im Kopf passiert. Und wer denkt, dass er schon alles weiß, kann sein Wissen gleich in einem großen Test auf die Probe stellen.Basiswissen aus Politik, Geschichte, Naturwissenschaften, Wirtschaft, Kultur und Alltag.
    12,98  TL68,30  TL
  • Banquet at Delmonico's: Great Minds, the Gilded Age, and the Triumph of Evolution in America

    Sert Kapak
    In Banquet at Delmonico’s, Barry Werth, the acclaimed author of The Scarlet Professor, draws readers inside the circle of philosophers, scientists, politicians, businessmen, clergymen, and scholars who brought Charles Darwin’s controversial ideas to America in the crucial years after the Civil War.The United States in the 1870s and ’80s was deep in turmoil–a brash young nation torn by a great depression, mired in scandal and corruption, rocked by crises in government, violently conflicted over science and race, and fired up by spiritual and sexual upheavals. Secularism was rising, most notably in academia. Evolution–and its catchphrase, “survival of the fittest”–animated and guided this Gilded Age.Darwin’s theory of natural selection was extended to society and morals not by Darwin himself but by the English philosopher Herbert Spencer, father of “the Law of Equal Freedom,” which holds that “every man is free to do that which he wills,” provided it doesn’t infringe on the equal freedom of others. As this justification took root as a social, economic, and ethical doctrine, Spencer won numerous influential American disciples and allies, including industrialist Andrew Carnegie, clergyman Henry Ward Beecher, and political reformer Carl Schurz. Churches, campuses, and newspapers convulsed with debate over the proper role of government in regulating Americans’ behavior, this country’s place among nations, and, most explosively, the question of God’s existence.In late 1882, most of the main figures who brought about and popularized these developments gathered at Delmonico’s, New York’s most venerable restaurant, in an exclusive farewell dinner to honor Spencer and to toast the social applications of the theory of evolution. It was a historic celebration from which the repercussions still ripple throughout our society.Banquet at Delmonico’s is social history at its finest, richest, and most appetizing, a brilliant narrative bristling with personal intrigue, tantalizing insights, and greater truths about American life and culture.
    27,52  TL64,00  TL
  • Technological Nature: Adaptation and the Future of Human Life

    Technological Nature: Adaptation and the Future of Human Life

    Sert Kapak
    Our forebears may have had a close connection with the natural world, but increasingly we experience technological nature. Children come of age watching digital nature programs on television. They inhabit virtual lands in digital games. And they play with robotic animals, purchased at big box stores. Until a few years ago, hunters could "telehunt" -- shoot and kill animals in Texas from a computer anywhere in the world via a Web interface. Does it matter that much of our experience with nature is mediated and augmented by technology? In Technological Nature, Peter Kahn argues that it does, and shows how it affects our well-being.Kahn describes his investigations of children's and adults' experiences of cutting-edge technological nature. He and his team installed "technological nature windows" (50-inch plasma screens showing high-definition broadcasts of real-time local nature views) in inside offices on his university campus and assessed the physiological and psychological effects on viewers. He studied children's and adults' relationships with the robotic dog AIBO (including possible benefits for children with autism). And he studied online "telegardening" (a pastoral alternative to "telehunting").Kahn's studies show that in terms of human well-being technological nature is better than no nature, but not as good as actual nature. We should develop and use technological nature as a bonus on life, not as its substitute, and re-envision what is beautiful and fulfilling and often wild in essence in our relationship with the natural world.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • The Business of Ecommerce: From Corporate Strategy to Technology (Breakthroughs in Application Development)

    The Business of Ecommerce: From Corporate Strategy to Technology (Breakthroughs in Application Development)

    Karton Kapak
    The Business of Ecommerce explains how to conduct business over the Web. Accessible and useful to both technical and nontechnical readers, the book describes the relevant business issues to technologists and technical issues to business managers. Paul May combines his experience as a consultant to both blue chip companies and Internet startups to provide a generic model for understanding ecommerce opportunities. He makes accessible all of the relevant technologies. This book empowers technical and business decision-makers to maximize the opportunities of ecommerce.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • New Tech, New Ties: How Mobile Communication Is Reshaping Social Cohesion

    New Tech, New Ties: How Mobile Communication Is Reshaping Social Cohesion

    Karton Kapak
    The message of this book is simple: the mobile phone strengthens social bonds among family and friends. With a traditional land-line telephone, we place calls to a location and ask hopefully if someone is "there"; with a mobile phone, we have instant and perpetual access to friends and family regardless of where they are. But when we are engaged in these intimate conversations with absent friends, what happens to our relationship with the people who are actually in the same room with us? In New Tech, New Ties, Rich Ling examines how the mobile telephone affects both kinds of interactions--those mediated by mobile communication and those that are face to face. Ling finds that through the use of various social rituals the mobile telephone strengthens social ties within the circle of friends and family--sometimes at the expense of interaction with those who are physically present--and creates what he calls "bounded solidarity." Ling argues that mobile communication helps to engender and develop social cohesion within the family and the peer group. Drawing on the work of Emile Durkheim, Erving Goffman, and Randall Collins, Ling shows that ritual interaction is a catalyst for the development of social bonding. From this perspective, he examines how mobile communication affects face-to-face ritual situations and how ritual is used in interaction mediated by mobile communication. He looks at the evidence, including interviews and observations from around the world, that documents the effect of mobile communication on social bonding and also examines some of the other possibly problematic issues raised by tighter social cohesion in small groups.Rich Ling is Senior Researcher at the Norwegian telecommunications company Telenor and Adjunct Research Scientist at the University of Michigan. He is the author of The Mobile Connection: The Cell Phone's Impact on Society.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • Prefiguring Cyberculture: An Intellectual History

    Prefiguring Cyberculture: An Intellectual History

    Sert Kapak
    The vast social apparatus of the computer network has aligned people with technology in unprecedented ways. The intimacy of the human-computer interface has made it impossible to distinguish technology from the social and cultural business of being human. Cyberculture is the broader name given to this process of becoming through technological means. This book shows that cyberculture has been a long time coming.In Prefiguring Cyberculture, media critics and theorists, philosophers, and historians of science explore the antecedents of such aspects of contemporary technological culture as the Internet, the World Wide Web, artificial intelligence, genetic engineering, virtual reality, and the cyborg. The contributors examine key texts that anticipate cybercultural practice and theory, including Plato's "Simile of the Cave"; the Renaissance Ars Memoria; Descartes's Meditations (on the mind-body split); Mary Shelley's Frankenstein; Alan Turing's Computing Machinery and Intelligence; Philip K. Dick's Man, Android, and Machine; William Gibson's Neuromancer; and Arthur C. Clarke's Profiles of the Future. In the final section, a number of cyberculture artists explore how cybercultural themes have been taken up and critiqued in the electronic arts.This book is not for sale in Australia and New Zealand
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • Metal and Flesh: The Evolution of Man: Technology Takes Over (Leonardo Books)

    Metal and Flesh: The Evolution of Man: Technology Takes Over (Leonardo Books)

    Sert Kapak
    For more than 3,000 years, humans have explored uncharted geographic and spiritual realms. Present-day explorers face new territories born from the coupling of living tissue and metal, strange lifeforms that are intelligent but unconscious, neither completely alive nor dead. Our bodies are now made of machines, images, and information. We are becoming cultural bodies in a world inhabited by cyborgs, clones, genetically modified animals, and innumerable species of human/information symbionts.Ollivier Dyens's Metal and Flesh is about two closely related phenomena: the technologically induced transformation of our perceptions of the world and the emergence of a cultural biology. Culture, according to Dyens, is taking control of the biosphere. Focusing on the twentieth century--which will be remembered as the century in which the living body was blurred, molded, and transformed by technology and culture--Dyens ruminates on the undeniable and irreversible human/machine entanglement that is changing the very nature of our lives.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • Talking with Computers: Explorations in the Science and Technology of Computing

    Talking with Computers: Explorations in the Science and Technology of Computing

    Karton Kapak
    Thomas Dean explores a wide range of fundamental topics in computer science, from digital logic and machine language to artificial intelligence and the World Wide Web, explaining how computers and computer programs work and how the various subfields of computer science are interconnected. Dean touches on a number of questions including: How can a computer learn to recognize junk email? What happens when you click on a link in a browser? How can you program a robot to do two things at once? Are there limits to what computers can do? Dean encourages readers to experiment with short programs and fragments of code written in several languages to strip away the mystery and reveal the underlying computational ideas. The accompanying website (www.cs.brown.edu/tld/talk) provides access to code fragments, tips on finding and installing software, links to online resources, and exercises. Throughout Talking With Computers, Dean conveys his fascination with computers and enthusiasm for working in a field that has changed almost every aspect of our daily lives. Thomas Dean is Professor in the Computer Science Department at Brown University, where he served as Acting Vice President for Computing and Information Services from 2001-2002. He is co-author of Planning and Control (Morgan-Kaufman, 1991) and Artificial Intelligence: Theory and Practice (Addison-Wesley, 1995).
    Temin Edilemiyor