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  • Eminent Victorians (Dover Books on Literature & Drama)

    Karton Kapak
    An unparalleled manifesto for the modern biographer, Lytton Strachey's razor-sharp essays about four prominent Victorians brought him tremendous fame. However, the great pacifist's subjects did not fare as well. Strachey skewers the legends glorifying Florence Nightingale, educator Thomas Arnold, Cardinal Henry Manning, and military hero General Charles "Chinese" Gordon. His incisive portraits challenge the nineteenth-century's preeminent values: humanitarianism, liberalism, evangelicism, and imperialism.First published in 1918, this book made an enormous impact on war-weary readers, who were seeking alternatives to Victorian manners and morals. In the Preface, Strachey notes of the role of biographer that "it is not his business to be complimentary; it is his business to lay bare the facts of the case, as he understands them. That is what I have aimed at in this book--to lay bare the facts of some cases, as I understand them, dispassionately, impartially, and without ulterior intentions." Strachey's approach to his subjects—recognizing their multifaceted, ambiguous, and often self-contradicting humanity—established a new style for biographical writing. Eminent Victorians remains one of the most influential and entertaining studies ever written.
    10,43  TL45,34  TL
  • The Iron Lady: Margaret Thatcher, from Grocer's Daughter to Prime Minister

    Karton Kapak
    The Iron Lady, the definitive Margaret Thatcher biography, is available just in time for the movie starring Meryl Streep as one of the most infamous figures in postwar politics. Whether you love her or hate her, Margaret Thatcher's impact on twentieth-century history is undeniable. From her humble, small-town upbringing to her rise to power as the United Kingdom's first female prime minister, to her dramatic fall from grace after more than three decades of service, celebrated biographer John Campbell delves into the story of this fascinating woman's life as no one has before. The result of more than nine years of meticulous research, The Iron Lady is the only balanced, unvarnished portrait of Margaret Thatcher, one of the most vital and controversial political figures of our time.
    36,76  TL42,25  TL
  • Favored Strangers: Gertrude Stein and Her Family

    Karton Kapak
    ". . . the first comprehensive biography of ›Gertrude| Stein since James Mellows' CHARMED CIRCLE. ›It| contains much material which was previously unavailable from family papers, letters, and archives, and is an important contribution to the wealth of Steiniana already in existence. . . . also discusses Stein and her family as Jews, an area that has heretofore received little but passing attention. . . ".--LAMBDA BOOK REPORT. 46 illustrations .
    39,44  TL47,52  TL
  • The Poker Bride: The First Chinese in the Wild West

    Karton Kapak
    When Gold Rush fever gripped the globe in 1849, thousands of Chinese came through San Francisco to seek fortune. In The Poker Bride, Christopher Corbett uses a legend of one extraordinary woman as a lens into this experience. Before 1849, the Chinese in the United States were little more than curiosities. But as word spread of gold in California, San Francisco's labyrinthine Chinatown sprang up, a city-within-a-city full of exotic foods and strange smells where Chinese women were smuggled into the country. At this time Polly, a young Chinese concubine, was brought by her owner to a remote mining camp in the highlands of Idaho, where he lost her in a poker game. Polly and her new owner then settled at an isolated ranch on the banks of the Salmon River. As the Gold Rush receded, it took with it the Chinese miners, but left behind Polly, who would make headlines when — as an old woman — she emerged from the Idaho hills nearly half a century later to tell her astounding story. The Poker Bride reconstructs a tale of the real American West: a place where the first Chinese flooded the country and left their mark long after the craze for gold had vanished.
    14,85  TL32,29  TL
  • Marilyn

    Sert Kapak
    Was there ever anyone else like Marilyn?  It's nearly 50 years since her untimely death and no one has been able to step into her shoes.  While her career, indeed her life, was marked by personal problems, and a reputation for being unreliable and difficult to work with, she is still responsible for such enduring favorites as Some Like it Hot, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, and The Seven Year Itch.Included with this book is a CD of songs that accompany the story of Marilyn's life. Beautifully illustrated by classic photography.
    65,36  TL130,72  TL
  • Calendar Girl: In Which a Lady of Rylstone Reveals All

    Karton Kapak
    It was a crazy idea and good for a laugh at the time: When Tricia Stewart proposed a more risqué treatment for her local Women’s Institute’s annual calendar, which normally featured tranquil scenes from nature, laughing alongside her was John Baker, the husband of the soon-to-be Miss February, Angela. When John passed away from cancer, the Ladies of Rylstone decided that posing nude for the calendar and donating the proceeds was one way to honor his memory and cope with this devastating loss. No one could have predicted what happened next. The calendar began to sell, and soon the whole world, it seemed, was interested in their story, with an American tour following and appearances on the Today show, 20/20, CNN, and the Tonight show. Calendar Girl explores the phenomenon that The Ladies of Rylstone became, recounting with warmth and humor the moments of an exhilarating journey that transformed the lives of the remarkable women who became international sensations.
    12,30  TL41,00  TL
  • The Poker Bride: The First Chinese in the Wild West

    Sert Kapak
    When gold rush fever gripped the globe in 1849, thousands of Chinese immigrants came through San Francisco on their way to seek their fortunes. They were called sojourners, for they never intended to stay. In The Poker Bride, Christopher Corbett uses a little-known legend from Idaho lore as a lens into this Chinese experience. Before 1849, the Chinese in the United States were little more than curiosities. But as word spread of the discovery of gold at Sutter's Mill in California, they soon became a regular sight in the American West. In San Francisco, a labyrinthine Chinatown soon sprang up, a clamorous city within a city full of exotic foods and strange smells, where Chinese women were smuggled into the country, and where the laws were made by "hatchet men." At this time, Polly, a young Chinese concubine, was brought by her owner by steamboat and pack train to a remote mining camp in the highlands of Idaho. There he lost her in a poker game, having wagered his last ounce of gold dust. Polly found her way with her new owner to an isolated ranch on the banks of the Salmon River in central Idaho. As the gold rush receded, it took with it the Chinese miners--or their bones, which were disinterred and shipped back to their homeland in accordance with Chinese custom. But it left behind Polly, who would make headlines when she emerged from the Idaho hills nearly half a century later to visit a modern city and tell her story. Peppered with characters such as Mark Twain and the legendary newswoman Cissy Patterson, The Poker Bride vividly reconstructs a lost period of history when the first Chinese sojourners flooded into the country, and left only glimmering traces of their presence scattered across the American West.
    16,53  TL57,00  TL
  • LIFE: Diana At 50

    Karton Kapak
    She was, indeed, the People's Princess. She belonged to them, and was beloved by them. For some reason that cannot be pinned down, this pretty young woman of the aristocracy, who married into royalty, connected with the common folk in a way that was unique and extraordinary. The people cared for and cared about Diana, and when she was killed in a tragic car accident in Paris, the outpouring of grief-not just in England, but globally-was overwhelming. To commemorate the 50th anniversary of Diana Spencer's birth, LIFE has assembled a celebratory chronicle of her too short but constantly vibrant time in the public eye. In family photos, we re visit Diana's youth and then, quickly enough, there is her courtship by Prince Charles. The Wedding of the Century really was that, an opulent extravaganza at St. Paul's that seemed a fairy tale, even unto the Glass Coach. LIFE was on the job at the time and in our pages appeared defining pictures from the day, as well as behind the scenes shots taken by the royals themselves. Those photographs resurface here, as do others from the magazine, which paid constant attention to Diana as she gracefully assumed the role of princess-perhaps the most famous princess of all time. LIFE followed her-and follows her here-as she set about doing her good works. Diana's family life with her handsome young boys in Kensington Palace is recounted, as are the travails when her marriage crumbles. On September 6, 1997, 2.5 billion people around the world watched Lady Di's funeral, televised from Westminster Abbey. LIFE revisits that sad day, and then parses Diana's legacy, catching up with her charismatic sons today- the older of whom, William, has just taken a bride. Kate Middleton now wears Diana's ring, and will one day be queen the very thing that was predicted for Diana, not so very long ago.
    28,82  TL57,63  TL
  • Elizabeth: The Life of Elizabeth Taylor

    Elizabeth: The Life of Elizabeth Taylor

    Karton Kapak
    Elizabeth Taylor is one of our last great movie stars. An Oscar-winning actress, she has lived her entire life in front of the spotlights, and her glamour and smouldering, sensual charisma are the stuff of legend. In Elizabeth, Alexander Walker presents the story of a life that was lived, on and off camera, with a passion rarely matched by even today's outspoken celebrities. From her privileged childhood, the influence of her strong-willed mother, and her rise to stardom in films like National Velvet, A Place in the Sun, and Cleopatra, to her husbands, her obsession with jewelry, and her amazing resilience in the face of public scandal and personal tragedy, Walker shows us the real Elizabeth--as an actress and as a person determined to live on her own terms.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • Nietzsche's Sister and the Will to Power: A Biography of Elisabeth Forster-Nietzsche (International Nietzsche Studies)

    Nietzsche's Sister and the Will to Power: A Biography of Elisabeth Forster-Nietzsche (International Nietzsche Studies)

    Karton Kapak
    A penetrating study of the sister who betrayed and endangered her famous brother's legacyIn 1901, a year after her brother Friedrich's death, Elisabeth Förster-Nietzsche published The Will to Power, a hasty compilation of writings he had never intended for print. In Nietzsche's Sister and the Will to Power, Carol Diethe contends that Förster-Nietzsche's own will to power and her desire to place herself--not her brother--at the center of cultural life in Germany are centrally responsible for Nietzsche's reputation as a belligerent and proto-Fascist thinker.Offering a new look at Nietzsche's sister from a feminist perspective, this spirited and erudite biography examines why Elisabeth Förster-Nietzsche recklessly consorted with anti-Semites, from her own husband to Hitler himself, out of convenience and a desire for revenge against a brother whose love for her waned after she caused the collapse of his friendship with Lou Salomé. The book also examines their family dynamics, Nietzsche's dismissal of his sister's early writing career, and the effects of limited education on intelligent women. Diethe concludes by detailing Förster-Nietzsche's brief marriage and her subsequent colonial venture in Paraguay, maintaining that her sporadic anti-Semitism was, like most things in her life, an expedient tool for cultivating personal success and status.A volume in the series International Nietzsche Studies, edited by Richard Schacht
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • Cleopatra: Last Queen of Egypt

    Cleopatra: Last Queen of Egypt

    Sert Kapak
    The Romans regarded her as “fatale monstrum”—a fatal omen. Pascal said the shape of her nose changed the history of the world. Shakespeare portrayed her as an icon of tragic love. But who was Cleopatra, really?Cleopatra was the last ruler of the Macedonian dynasty of Ptolemies. Highly intelligent, she spoke many languages and was rumored to be the only Ptolemy to read and speak Egyptian. Her famous liaisons with Julius Caesar and Mark Antony had as much to do with politics as the heart. Ruthless in dealing with her enemies, many within her own family, Cleopatra steered her kingdom through difficult times, and very nearly succeeded in creating an eastern empire to rival the growing might of Rome.Her story was well documented by her near contemporaries, and the tragic tale of contrasts and oppositions—the seductive but failing power of ancient Egypt versus the virile strength of modern Rome—is so familiar we almost feel that we know Cleopatra. But our picture is highly distorted. Cleopatra is often portrayed as a woman ruled by emotion rather than reason; a queen hurtling towards inevitable self-destruction. But these tales of seduction, intrigue, and suicide by asp have obfuscated Cleopatra’s true political genius.Stripping away our preconceptions, many of them as old as Egypt’s Roman conquerors, Egyptologist Joyce Tyldesley offers a magnificent biography of a most extraordinary queen.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • The Six Wives of Henry VIII

    The Six Wives of Henry VIII

    Karton Kapak
    The tempestuous, bloody, and splendid reign of Henry VIII of England (1509-1547) is one of the most fascinating in all history, not least for his marriage to six extraordinary women. In this accessible work of brilliant scholarship, Alison Weir draws on early biographies, letters, memoirs, account books, and diplomatic reports to bring these women to life. Catherine of Aragon emerges as a staunch though misguided woman of principle; Anne Boleyn, an ambitious adventuress with a penchant for vengeance; Jane Seymour, a strong-minded matriarch in the making; Anne of Cleves, a good-natured and innocent woman naively unaware of the court intrigues that determined her fate; Catherine Howard, an empty-headed wanton; and Catherine Parr, a warm-blooded bluestocking who survived King Henry to marry a fourth time.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • At Home in the Vineyard: Cultivating a Winery, an Industry, and a Life

    At Home in the Vineyard: Cultivating a Winery, an Industry, and a Life

    Sert Kapak
    This moving, evocative memoir, woven with lyrical descriptions of the sights and smells of vineyard life, tells the inspirational story of one woman's journey to success in an industry run mostly by men. "At Home in the Vineyard, "filled with colorful characters and unexpected experiences, brings a local rural community vividly alive as Oregon wine pioneer and industry icon Susan Sokol Blosser recounts how she fell in love with a vineyard, learned how to run it, and ultimately achieved her vision of producing Pinot Noirs to rival those of Burgundy. An intimate family story, "At Home in the Vineyard "also gives a candid insider's view of Oregon's flourishing wine industry. Sokol Blosser begins her narrative in the 1970s, when, as a young, idealistic wife, she helped her husband make his wild idea of planting a vineyard in the Dundee Hills become a reality. By the book's final pages, she has become president of Sokol Blosser Winery, widely respected for gaining national visibility and for producing world-class wines, especially the elusive Pinot Noir. Along the way, Sokol Blosser tells how she learned to do everything from driving a tractor and managing a picking crew to selling Oregon wine in Manhattan. She also shares some special accomplishments: how she instituted values of environmental sustainability and social responsibility at the vineyard, integrated family and business life, and successfully brought the second generation on board.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • Dreamers of a New Day: Women Who Invented the Twentieth Century

    Dreamers of a New Day: Women Who Invented the Twentieth Century

    Karton Kapak
    From the 1880s to the 1920s, a profound social awakening among women extended the possibilities of change far beyond the struggle for the vote. Amid the growth of globalized trade, mass production, immigration and urban slums, American and British women broke with custom and prejudice. Taking off corsets, forming free unions, living communally, buying ethically, joining trade unions, doing social work in settlements, these “dreamers of a new day” challenged ideas about sexuality, mothering, housework, the economy and citizenship. Drawing on a wealth of research, Sheila Rowbotham has written a groundbreaking new history that shows how women created much of the fabric of modern life. These innovative dreamers raised questions that remain at the forefront of our twenty-first-century lives.
    Temin Edilemiyor
  • Snowblind: A Brief Career in the Cocaine Trade

    Snowblind: A Brief Career in the Cocaine Trade

    Karton Kapak
    Robbert Sabbag’s Snowblind, the true story of an American smuggler whose intricate, ingenious scams made him a legendary figure in the cocaine world of the late sixties and early seventies, is a modern classic. In this “witty, intelligent, fiercely stylish, drug-induced exemplary tale” (Los Angeles Times), Sabbag masterfully traces Zachary Swan’s Roman-candle career, from his first forays into smuggling marijuana to his jaunts to Colombia to buy pure cocaine, and his ever more elaborate plans to outwit the police and customs officials. Updated by the author and featuring a newly designed cover, this captivating portrait of a dashing antihero and enthralling look at a turbulent age is sure to reach a new generation of readers.
    Temin Edilemiyor