Ancient

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  • Jewish Antiquities (Wordsworth Classics of World Literature)

    Karton Kapak
    The works of the Jewish writer Flavius Josephus represent one of the most important records of Judaism and the Jews that survive from the ancient world. The Jewish Antiquities, his largest historical enterprise, is an account in twenty books of Jewish history from the creation to the outbreak of the Jewish revolt against Rome in AD 66. Here is all the drama of the Old Testament transformed into a historical narrative of Greco-Roman character; and more important, our only continuous account of Middle Eastern affairs in the two hundred years that led up to the revolt. William Whiston, successor to Isaac Newton as Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge, published his famous translation of Josephus' works in 1737. The modern system of chapter divisions has been added.
    13,65  TL39,00  TL
  • Lives of the Twelve Caesars (Wordsworth Classics of World Literature) (Wadsworth Classics of World Literature)

    Karton Kapak
    Suetonius, chronicler of the extraordinary personalities of the first dynasties to rule the Roman Empire, was the greatest Latin biographer. His colourful work, Lives of the Twelve Caesars, is, along with Tacitus, the major source for the period from Julius Caesar to Domitian. He sets out in vivid detail a great range of aspects illuminating the emperor's characters, their habits, from table to bedchamber - their intrigues, their loves and their deaths. Himself a court official, he quotes from a variety of sources, from the official and private documents as well as from old anecdotes, gossip, songs and jokes, giving an unparalleled oblique view of his subjects. Long familiar to students of classics, he found a new audience as the main source for Robert Graves' novels and the subsequent television series I, Claudius.
    13,65  TL39,00  TL
  • Lives of Confucius: Civilization's Greatest Sage Through the Ages

    Sert Kapak
    Confucius—“Master Kung” (551–479 BCE), the Chinese thinker and social philosopher—originated teachings that have deeply influenced Chinese, Korean, Japanese, and Vietnamese thought and life over many centuries. His philosophy emphasized personal and governmental morality, justice, and appropriateness in social relationships. In time these values gained prom­inence in China over other doctrines, such as Taoism and even Buddhism. His thoughts later developed into a system of philosophy known as Confucianism. Today there remain many mysteries about the actual circumstances of his life, and the development of his influence has yet to be encapsulated for the general reader. But with Michael Nylan and Thomas Wilson’s Lives of Confucius, many mysteries are laid to rest about his historical life, and fascinating details emerge about how his mythic stature evolved over time, right up to the present day.
    14,85  TL34,54  TL
  • The Annals (Dover Value Editions)

    Karton Kapak
    "The first writer in the world, without a single exception," declared Thomas Jefferson of Tacitus, proclaiming this book "a compound of history and morality of which we have no other example." The ancient historian wrote this vital chronicle of Imperial Rome during the great civilization's decline. It spans A.D. 14-68, painting incisive psychological portraits of the era's major figures.Tacitus held high offices in the Roman government, allowing him firsthand views of the emperors and the effects of their tyranny. His chronicle begins with the death of Augustus and relates the moral decline and rampant civil unrest during the reigns of Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero. He also discusses in detail the period's many military campaigns. Masterful in his handling of dramatic narrative and trenchant in his discourse, Tacitus is the model historian. The Annals not only records the past but also re-creates it for modern readers.
    11,75  TL29,37  TL
  • The Divided City: On Memory and Forgetting in Ancient Athens

    Karton Kapak
    Athens, 403 B.C.E. The bloody oligarchic dictatorship of the Thirty is over, and the democrats have returned to the city victorious. Renouncing vengeance, in an act of willful amnesia, citizens call for -- -if not invent -- -amnesty. They agree to forget the unforgettable, the "past misfortunes," of civil strife or stasis. More precisely, what they agree to deny is that stasis -- -simultaneously partisanship, faction, and sedition -- -is at the heart of their politics.Continuing a criticism of Athenian ideology begun in her pathbreaking study The Invention of Athens, Nicole Loraux argues that this crucial moment of Athenian political history must be interpreted as constitutive of politics and political life and not as a threat to it. Divided from within, the city is formed by that which it refuses. Conflict, the calamity of civil war, is the other, dark side of the beautiful unitary city of Athens. In a brilliant analysis of the Greek word for voting, diaphora, Loraux underscores the conflictual and dynamic motion of democratic life. Voting appears as the process of dividing up, of disagreement -- -in short, of agreeing to divide and choose. Not only does Loraux reconceptualize the definition of ancient Greek democracy, she also allows the contemporary reader to rethink the functioning of modern democracy in its critical moments of internal stasis.
    17,35  TL49,57  TL
  • Classical Greece and the Birth of Western Art

    Karton Kapak
    What was the "Classical Revolution" in Greek art? What were its contexts, aims, achievements, and impact? This book introduces students to these questions and offers some answers to them. Andrew Stewart examines Greek architecture, painting, and sculpture of the fifth and fourth centuries BC in relation to the great political, social, cultural, and intellectual issues of the period. Intended for use in courses in classical civilization as well as Greek art and archaeology, his book draws on Greek lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy, historiography, oratory, and philosophy in order to illuminate the art of the period.
    32,48  TL69,10  TL
  • Detour and Access: Strategies of Meaning in China and Greece

    Sert Kapak
    In what way do we benefit from speaking of things indirectly? How does such a distancing allow us better to discover -- and describe -- people and objects? How does distancing produce an effect? What can we gain from approaching the world obliquely? In other words, how does detour grant access?Thus begins Francois Jullien's investigation into the strategy, subtlety, and production of meaning in ancient and modern Chinese aesthetic and political texts and events. Moving between the rhetorical traditions of ancient Greece and China, Jullien does not attempt a simple comparison of the two civilizations. Instead, he uses the perspective provided by each to gain access into a culture considered by many Westerners to be strange -- "It's all Chinese to me" -- and whose strangeness has been eclipsed through the assumption of its familiarity. He also uses the comparison to shed light on the role of Greek thinking in Western civilization.Jullien rereads the major texts of Chinese thought -- The Book of Songs, Confucius's Analects, and the work of Mencius and Lao-Tse. He addresses the question of oblique, indirect, and allusive meaning in order to explore how the techniques of detour provide access to subtler meanings than are attainable through direct approaches. Indirect speech, Jullien concludes, yields a complex mode of indication, open to multiple perspectives and variations, infinitely adaptable to particular situations and contexts. Concentrating on that which is not said, or which is spoken only through other means, Jullien traces the benefits and costs of this rhetorical strategy in which absolute truth is absent.
    32,47  TL92,77  TL
  • Lives of the Ancient Egyptians: Pharaohs, Queens, Courtiers and Commoners

    Sert Kapak
    100 biographies reveal the true character and diversity of the ancient world's greatest civilizationThe biographies included here give voice not only to ancient Egypt's rulers but also to the people who built the great monuments, staffed government offices, farmed, served in the temples, and fought to defend the country's borders. Spanning thousands of years of ancient Egyptian history, the book offers a fresh perspective on an always fascinating civilization through the lives of:The god-kings, from great rulers like Khufu and Ramesses II to less famous monarchs such as Amenemhat I and Osorkon Egypt's queens: the powerful Tiye, the beautiful Nefertiti, Tutankhamun's tragic child-bride Ankhesenamun, and the infamous CleopatraThe officials who served the pharaoh: the architect Imhotep who designed the first pyramid, the court dwarf Perniankhu, and the royal sculptor BakOrdinary women who are often overlooked in official accounts: Hemira, a humble priestess from a provincial Delta town, and Naunakht, whose will reveals the trials and tribulations of family lifeCommoners and foreigners such as the irascible farmer Hekanakht, the serial criminal Paneb, and Urhiya, the mercenary who rose to the rank of general in the Egyptian army.Profusely illustrated with works of art and scenes of daily life, Lives of the Ancient Egyptians offers remarkable insights into the history and culture of the Nile Valley and very personal glimpses of a vanished world. 200 illustrations, 80 in color
    48,04  TL96,08  TL
  • The Medieval Greek Romance

    Karton Kapak
    First published by CUP in 1989, The Medieval Greek Romance provides basic information for the non-specialist about Greek fiction during the period 1071-1453, as well as proposing new solutions to problems that have vexed previous generations of scholars. Roderick Beaton applies sophisticated methods of literary analysis to the material, and the bridges of the artificial gap which has separated `Byzantine'literature, in a form of ancient Greek as both homogenous and of a high level of literary sophistication.Throughout, consideration is given to relations and interconnections with similar literature in western Europe. As most of the texts discussed are not available in English translation, the argument is illustrated by lucid plot summaries and extensive quotation (accompanied by literal English renderings).For this edition, The Medieval Greek Romance has been revised throughout and expanded with the addition of an `Afterword' which assesses and responds to recent work on the subject.
    31,68  TL121,83  TL
  • Slave Revolts in Antiquity

    Karton Kapak
    Although much has been written on Greek and Roman slavery in antiquity, the same cannot be said for slave resistance in this period. Slave revolts have typically been dismissed as historically insignificant or exceptional events resulting from peculiar historical circumstances. In the first in-depth work on this topic to be published in two decades, Theresa Urbainczyk challenges much current thinking by looking beyond the canonical sources to reveal a longer and far more significant history of slave resistance. Her engaging, up-to-date account considers the circumstances of these revolts, looks at slave leaders and how they are recorded in history, explores the aims of slaves, examines attitudes toward freedom and slavery, and more. Dissecting both ancient and modern sources, she finds that the writers who recorded and rerecorded these slave rebellions and wars had every reason to repress large-scale resistance or to reconfigure it as something other than what it was. Slave Revolts in Antiquity also addresses one of the most important issues of our own time: the meaning of freedom itself.Copub: Acumen Publishing Limited
    26,26  TL65,66  TL
  • The Divided City: On Memory and Forgetting in Ancient Athens

    Sert Kapak
    Athens, 403 B.C.E. The bloody oligarchic dictatorship of the Thirty is over, and the democrats have returned to the city victorious. Renouncing vengeance, in an act of willful amnesia, citizens call for -- -if not invent -- -amnesty. They agree to forget the unforgettable, the "past misfortunes," of civil strife or stasis. More precisely, what they agree to deny is that stasis -- -simultaneously partisanship, faction, and sedition -- -is at the heart of their politics.Continuing a criticism of Athenian ideology begun in her pathbreaking study The Invention of Athens, Nicole Loraux argues that this crucial moment of Athenian political history must be interpreted as constitutive of politics and political life and not as a threat to it. Divided from within, the city is formed by that which it refuses. Conflict, the calamity of civil war, is the other, dark side of the beautiful unitary city of Athens. In a brilliant analysis of the Greek word for voting, diaphora, Loraux underscores the conflictual and dynamic motion of democratic life. Voting appears as the process of dividing up, of disagreement -- -in short, of agreeing to divide and choose. Not only does Loraux reconceptualize the definition of ancient Greek democracy, she also allows the contemporary reader to rethink the functioning of modern democracy in its critical moments of internal stasis.
    25,24  TL84,13  TL
  • The Gold of the Pharaphs

    Karton Kapak
    In the popular imagination, Ancient Egypt is defined by its monumental architecture and treasure-packed royal tombs. What many people don't realize is that most of the tombs were plundered by grave robbers shortly after their royal occupants were interred. Fortunately, since the late 19th century, archaeologists have been able to save a large part of the treasure in tombs that had not been plundered. This book, through its text and illustrations, gives the reader exceptional insight into the genius of the ancient Egyptians, for whom gold was "the flesh of the gods".
    18,32  TL67,87  TL
  • China (Kharakter)

    Karton Kapak
    Book by Sol, Anne, Cabourdin, Willy
    9,24  TL92,38  TL
  • Alexander: The Conqueror

    Sert Kapak
    No individual has made his mark on the world more profoundly than Alexander the Great, the young man who, through war, diplomacy, and Machiavellian means, expanded his empire to include most of the known world--all before he died at age thirty-three. A remarkable man whose path crossed with some of the most influential people, places, and events of all time, Alexander began his combat training at age seven, studied philosophy with Aristotle at age thirteen, kept a copy of Homer's Iliad under his pillow until his death, and introduced Greek and oriental cultural influences throughout his vast empire.Alexander: The Conqueror follows the progression of his conquests through the Near East and Central Asia to the Indus Valley, and introduces Alexander's family, the personalities of his generals, and the cultures of the lands he conquered. Author Laura Foreman examines the complex character of Alexander as student, friend, lover, military genius, and emperor, and explores the many unsolved mysteries surrounding his life: Who did Alexander turn to in passion and for comfort? Was Alexander a careful, amiable mastermind or a drunken brute? Could Alexander have been responsible for his father's murder?Gorgeous landscape photography, numerous images of ancient art and artifacts, and informative, beautifully crafted maps complement the narrative, offering a visual feast along with a lively, insightful narrative of Alexander's life of conquest and intrigue.
    31,70  TL63,39  TL
  • Life in Ancient Rome

    Karton Kapak
    Ancient Rome, as a subject, has always attracted and fascinated people. The extent of its vast empire, much of it a result of its efficient military power, was such that many Romans believed that they governed the whole world, as it was then known, and that its was their right and destiny to do this. That empire has influenced later civilisations and its classical tradition can be seen in our own day in such diverse areas as language, customs, architecture and modes of thought. Visitors to Rome, throughout the centuries, have marvelled at its monuments and speculated on the lives of its people. This book, concentrating on life in the city of Rome in the late republic and the empire, also takes examples from Rome's provinces. Readers will have the opportunity to gain knowledge of people through Rome's government, administration, economy and trade. They can contemplate how ordinary Romans lived their daily lives - how they worshipped, travelled, fed themselves, entertained and were entertained. It cannot be denied that Roman society could be a cruel one especially to those who opposed it or lived on its fringes, but it tried to establish a just and reasonable form of government for the whole of its empire. Much of the evidence comes from the writings of those who lived in that society, one in which they were proud and honoured to be a citizen of Rome.
    22,34  TL51,96  TL