Modern (16Th-21St Centuries)

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  • London Labour and the London Poor (Wordsworth Classics of World Literature)

    Karton Kapak
    With an Introduction by Rosemary O'Day. London Labour and the London Poor is a masterpiece of personal inquiry and social observation. It is the classic account of life below the margins in the greatest Metropolis in the world and a compelling portrait of the habits, tastes, amusements, appearance, speech, humour, earnings and opinions of the labouring poor at the time of the Great Exhibition. In scope, depth and detail it remains unrivalled. Mayhew takes us into the abyss, into a world without fixed employment where skills are declining and insecurity mounting, a world of criminality, pauperism and vice, of unorthodox personal relations and fluid families, a world from which regularity is absent and prosperity has departed. Making sense of this environment required curiosity, imagination and a novelist s eye for detail, and Henry Mayhew poss­essed all three. No previous writer had succeeded in presenting the poor through their own stories and in their own words, and in this undertaking Mayhew rivals his contemporary Dickens. To pass from one to the other, writes one authority, is to cross sides of the same street.
    9,75  TL39,00  TL
  • The Crisis of Modern Times: Perspectives from The Review of Politics, 1939-1962 (The Review of Politics Series)

    Karton Kapak
    In the 1940s and 1950s The Review of Politics, under the dynamic leadership of Waldemar Gurian, emerged as one of the leading journals of political and social theory in the United States. This volume celebrates that legacy by bringing together classic essays by a remarkable group of American and European émigré intellectuals, among them Jacques Maritain, Hannah Arendt, Josef Pieper, Eric Voegelin, and Yves Simon. For these writers, the emergence of new dictatorial regimes in Germany and Russia and the looming threat of another, even more devastating, European war demanded that one rethink the reigning philosophical perspectives of the time. In their view, the western world had lost sight of its founding principles. Individually and collectively, they maintained that the West could be saved only if its leaders embraced the idea that society should be governed by moral standards and a commitment to human dignity.Since the first issue appeared in 1939, The Review of Politics has influenced generations of political theorists. To complement these essays A. James McAdams has written an introduction that discusses the history of the journal and reflects on the contributions of these influential figures. He underscores the continuing relevance of these essays in assessing contemporary issues.“The essays contained in this volume demonstrate why the Review of Politics is a national treasure. From Jacques Maritain and Yves Simon to Hannah Arendt and Leo Strauss, it has consistently attracted writers of the highest quality to think about the deepest problems of politics and the twentieth century. The themes covered in this collection range from totalitarianism and nihilism to the value of education and the dignity of the individual. Their probity and intelligence show why the Review of Politics has remained the premier journal for serious students of political philosophy.” —Steven B. Smith, Alfred Cowles Professor of Political Science, Yale University  “The Review of Politics has been essential reading for students of political philosophy and politics for more than two generations, including among its contributors internationally renowned scholars whose works are both enormously influential and increasingly look to be contemporary expressions of perennial wisdom. To make seminal essays of this remarkable journal easily accessible, with more to come in future volumes, is a great service to students of political science at every level.” —Timothy Fuller, Lloyd E. Worner Distinguished Service Professor, Colorado College
    26,20  TL79,38  TL
  • A Brief Introduction to Modern Arabic Literature

    Karton Kapak
    This short book offers a unique overview of modern Arabic literature, focusing on developments over the last fifty years and providing a guide to the literary landscape, indicating the major landmarks in the shape of authors, ideas, and debates.This is the second of two titles published to launch a new series offering insight into Arabic advances in science and culture. Aimed at the general reader, the titles are illustrated and contain glossaries, indices, and suggestions for further reading.David Tresilian has taught at Columbia University and the American University in Cairo. He has been at the American University of Paris since 1999.
    15,72  TL27,10  TL
  • The Voyage of the Beagle (Wordsworth Classics of World Literature)

    Karton Kapak
    Charles Darwin's travels around the world as an independent naturalist on HMS Beagle between 1831 and 1836 impressed upon him a sense of the natural world's beauty and sublimity which language could barely capture. Words, he said, were inadequate to convey to those who have not visited the inter-tropical regions, the sensation of delight which the mind experiences'. Yet in a travel journal which takes the reader from the coasts and interiors of South America to South Sea Islands, Darwin's descriptive powers are constantly challenged, but never once overcome. In addition, The Voyage of the Beagle displays Darwin's powerful, speculative mind at work, posing searching questions about the complex relation between the Earth's structure, animal forms, anthropology and the origins of life itself.
    13,65  TL39,00  TL
  • Life under Pressure: Mortality and Living Standards in Europe and Asia, 1700-1900 (Eurasian Population and Family History)

    Karton Kapak
    This highly original book -- the first in a series analyzing historical population behavior in Europe and Asia -- pioneers a new approach to the comparative analysis of societies in the past. Using techniques of event history analysis, the authors examine 100,000 life histories in 100 rural communities in Western Europe and Asia to analyze the demographic response to social and economic pressures. In doing so they challenge the accepted Eurocentric Malthusian view of population processes and demonstrate that population behavior has not been as uniform as previously thought -- that it has often been determined by human agency, particularly social structure and cultural practice.The authors examine the complex relationship between human behavior and social and economic environment, analyzing age, gender, family, kinship, social class and social organization, climate, food prices, and real wages to compare mortality responses to adversity. Their research at the individual, household, and community levels challenges the previously accepted characterizations of social and economic behavior in Europe and Asia in the past. The originality of the analysis as well as the geographic breadth and historical depth of the data make Life Under Pressure a significant advance in the field of historical demography. Its findings will be of interest to scholars in economics, environmental studies, demography, history, and sociology as well as the general reader interested in these subjects.
    26,08  TL52,16  TL
  • Kashmir: The Case for Freedom

    Karton Kapak
    Kashmir is one of the most protracted and bloody occupations in the world—and one of the most ignored. Under an Indian military rule that, at half a million strong, exceeds the total number of US forces in Iraq and Afghanistan, freedom of speech is non-existent, and human- rights abuses and atrocities are routinely visited on its Muslim-majority population. In the last two decades alone, over seventy thousand people have died. Ignored by its own corrupt politicians, abandoned by Pakistan and the West, which refuses to bring pressure to bear on its regional ally, India, the Kashmiri people’s ongoing quest for justice and self- determination continues to be brutally suppressed. Exploring the causes and consequences of the occupation, Kashmir: The Case for Freedom is a passionate call for the end of occupation, and for the right of self- determination for the Kashmiri people.
    24,86  TL32,29  TL
  • The Kantian Legacy in Nineteenth-Century Science (Dibner Institute Studies in the History of Science and Technology)

    The contributions of Kantian thought to modern mathematics, mathematical logic, and the foundations of mathematics are now widely acknowledged by scholars. As the essays in this volume show, the general development of modern scientific thought--including the physical sciences, the life sciences, and mathematics--can be viewed as an evolution from Kant through Poincaré to Einstein and the logical positivists and beyond. Focusing on nineteenth-century science, the essays--by historians of philosophy, science, and mathematics--trace the multiple intellectual transformations that have led from Kant's original scientific situation to the scientific problems of the twentieth century.The book examines Kant's influence on five strands of nineteenth-century scientific thought: Naturphilosophie and the effect of German Romanticism (especially Goethe) on biology; Fries's philosophy of science; Helmholtz's rejection of Naturphilosophie and Romanticism; neo-Kantianism and its return to "methodological" concerns in natural science and academic philosophy; and Poincaré and his reflections on scientific epistemology. The essays give a nuanced picture of Kant's legacy to nineteenth-century thinkers and of the rich interaction between philosophical ideas and discoveries in the natural and mathematical sciences during this period. They point to the ways that the scientific developments of the nineteenth century link Kant's thought to the science of the twentieth century.Contributors:Frederick Beiser, Robert DiSalle, Janet Folina, Michael Friedman, Jeremy Gray, Frederick Gregory, Michael Heidelberger, Timothy Lenoir, Jesper Lützen, Alfred Nordmann, Helmut Pulte, Robert Richards, Alan Richardson
    43,87  TL107,00  TL
  • The Cambridge Introduction to The Nineteenth-Century American Novel (Cambridge Introductions to Literature)

    Karton Kapak
    Stowe, Hawthorne, Melville, and Twain: these are just a few of the world-class novelists of nineteenth-century America. The nineteenth-century American novel was a highly fluid form, constantly evolving in response to the turbulent events of the period and emerging as a key component in American identity, growth, expansion and the Civil War. Gregg Crane tells the story of the American novel from its beginnings in the early republic to the end of the nineteenth century. Treating the famous and many less well-known works, Crane discusses the genre's major figures, themes and developments. He analyses the different types of American fiction - romance, sentimental fiction, and the realist novel - in detail, while the historical context is explained in relation to how novelists explored the changing world around them. This comprehensive and stimulating introduction will enhance students' experience of reading and studying the whole canon of American fiction.
    24,77  TL66,94  TL
  • What the Industrial Revolution Did for Us

    Sert Kapak
    The latest in the popular What theDid For Us series of books, What the Industrial Revolution Did For Us is a journey back in time, giving the reader an insight into how British life was transformed between 1750 and 1830, and how it shaped the world we live in today. So what did the Industrial Revolution do for us? Without the huge advances in science, engineering and medicine and the cast of extraordinarily colourful inventors and scientists who revolutionised the way we think, our modern world would be very different. We would be without vaccinations against contagious diseases and have no anaesthetics for surgery. The industrial revolution also gave birth to our national obsession with tea drinking, the mass production of crockery for the house-proud newly emerging Middle Classes and the transformation of clothing worn by the ordinary man and woman. As well as huge leaps in the evolution of machinery and manufacturing, our transport system was completely overhauled as the first ever steam trains emerged, roads were drastically improved, and canal mania took over Britain. The great industrial cities burgeoned and London became the international power it still is today. From the quacks advertising their potions to the new Middle Classes to the great innovators and entrepreneurs such as Robert Stephenson, James Watt and Josiah Wedgwood, What the Industrial Revolution Did For Us takes us right to the heart of the excitement of this revolutionary age. This book and the BBC television series it accompanies takes us back in time in the eyes of the eighteenth century tourist embracing the newness and invention of this incredible era. Contents: Introduction by Dan Cruickshank Chapter 1: A Potent Brew Chapter 1 looks at the remarkable discoveries that, in just 100 years, created the modern global economy and much of the world in which we live. It tells the story of coal and iron, but also of tea, the invention of the toaster and how Kew Gardens came to be formed. Chapter 2: New Lives: New Landscapes How industrialisation changed the face of modern Britain with the development of machines that took work out of the home and into factories. Chapter 3: Steaming Along We travel through the longest tunnels, over the highest bridges and in the first ever steam trains to explore the impact of the Industrial Revolution on the way we get from A to B. Chapter 4: The Lure of London From the architecture of London to the development of shopping and the start of the modern consumer society. Chapter 5: A Remedy for Quacks Up until the mid 18th century, you had a better chance of survival if you chose not to visit a doctor. But these rather grim facts of life and death were about to change. The Industrial Revolution brought the hope that technology and progress might produce a world without disease and suffering. Modern Medicine covers everything from anaesthetic to Scurvy, vaccines to madness. Chapter 6: Cannon-Fire This chapter focuses on the developments taking place in warfare and weapons during this turbulent period.
    23,06  TL76,86  TL
  • Darwin: Portrait of a Genius

    Sert Kapak
    Eminent historian Paul Johnson provides a rich, succinct portrait of Charles DarwinCharles Darwin is arguably the most influential scientist of all time. His Origin of Species forever changed our concept of the world’s creation. Darwin’s revolutionary career is the perfect vehicle for historian Paul Johnson. Marked by the insightful observation, spectacular wit, and highly readable prose for which Johnson is so well regarded, Darwin brings the gentleman-scientist and his times brilliantly into focus. From Darwin’s birth into great fortune to his voyage aboard the Beagle, to the long-delayed publication of his masterpiece, Johnson delves into what made this Victorian gentleman into a visionary scientist—and into the tragic flaws that later led Darwin to support the burgeoning eugenics movement.Johnson’s many admirers as well as history and science buffs will be grateful for this superb account of Darwin and the everlasting impact of his discoveries.
    17,66  TL58,85  TL
  • Religion in Modern Islamic Discourse (Columbia/Hurst)

    Sert Kapak
    Religion as an analytical category doesn't lend itself to the reexamination and reinvention of tradition, especially in Islam, where the lines demarcating religion, culture, civilization, and politics are kept deliberately ambiguous. Religion in Modern Islamic Discourse examines the place of religion in debates and discussions from the nineteenth century to the present. Abdulkader Tayob follows the transformation of Islamic discourse, both in its adaptation and resistance to modernity. Tayob focuses on the efforts by intellectuals to reconcile Islam with the forces of modernization. He begins in Egypt and colonial India, closely reading works on the essence of religion and its social value. He then explores key contributions on identity, state, law, and gender. Tayob's analysis reveals the deep structural foundations of Islam's approach to religion, religious values, and spirituality, providing an unusually creative perspective on the evolution of its modern discourse.
    26,23  TL45,22  TL
  • Revolution and the People in Russia and China: A Comparative History (The Wiles Lectures)

    Karton Kapak
    A unique comparative account of the roots of Communist revolution in Russia and China. Steve Smith examines the changing social identities of peasants who settled in St Petersburg from the 1880s to 1917 and in Shanghai from the 1900s to the 1940s. Russia and China, though very different societies, were both dynastic empires with backward agrarian economies that suddenly experienced the impact of capitalist modernity. This book argues that far more happened to these migrants than simply being transformed from peasants into workers. It explores the migrants' identification with their native homes; how they acquired new understandings of themselves as individuals and new gender and national identities. It asks how these identity transformations fed into the wider political, social and cultural processes that culminated in the revolutionary crises in Russia and China, and how the Communist regimes that emerged viewed these transformations in the working classes they claimed to represent.
    26,21  TL77,08  TL
  • The Cambridge Companion to Modern American Culture (Cambridge Companions to Culture)

    Karton Kapak
    The Cambridge Companion to Modern American Culture offers a comprehensive, authoritative and accessible overview of the cultural themes and intellectual issues that drive the dominant culture of the twentieth century. This companion explores the social, political and economic forces that have made America what it is today. It shows how these contexts impact upon twentieth-century American literature, cinema and art. An international team of contributors examines the special contribution of African Americans and of immigrant communities to the variety and vibrancy of modern America. The essays range from art to politics, popular culture to sport, immigration and race to religion and war. Varied, extensive and challenging, this Companion is essential reading for students and teachers of American studies around the world. It is the most accessible and useful introduction available to an exciting range of topics in modern American culture.
    32,78  TL71,26  TL
  • Alien Policy in Belgium, 1840-1940: The Creation of Guest Workers, Refugees and Illegal Aliens

    Sert Kapak
    Belgium has a unique place in the history of migration in that it was the first among industrialized nations in Continental Europe to develop into an immigrant society. In the nineteenth century Italians, Jews, Poles, Czechs, and North Africans settled in Belgium to work in industry and commerce. They were followed by Russians in the 1920s and Germans in the 1930s who were seeking a safe haven from persecution by totalitarian regimes. In the nineteenth century immigrants were to a larger extent integrated into Belgian society: they were denied political rights but participated on equal terms with Belgians in social life. This changed radically in the twentieth century; by 1940 the rights of aliens were severely curtailed, while those of Belgian citizens, in particular in the social domain, were extended. While the state evolved into a "welfare state" for its citizens it became more of a police state for immigrants. The state only tolerated immigrants who were prepared to carry out those jobs that were shunned by the Belgians. Under the pressure of public opinion, an exception was made in the cases of thousands of Jewish refugees that had fled from Nazi Germany. However, other immigrants were subjected to harsh regulations and in fact became the outcasts of twentieth-century Belgian liberal society. This remarkable study examines in depth and over a long time span how (anti-) alien policies were transformed, resulting in an illiberal exclusion of foreigners at the same time as democratization and the welfare state expanded. In this respect Belgium is certainly not unique but offers an interesting case study of developments that are characteristic for Europe as a whole.
    20,20  TL202,02  TL
  • The Irrepressible Churchill: Winston's World, Wars & Wit

    Sert Kapak
    Sir Winston Churchill remains Britain's most iconic statesman and one of the 20th century's greatest orators. Written mainly in his own words, this new edition of a classic work details his remarkable career as well as his extraordinary life. Collated by Kay Halle, a close family friend of the Churchills, it provides an invaluable record of Sir Winston's thoughts, opinions, wit, and wisdom.
    19,20  TL38,41  TL
  • Bargaining on Europe (Britain and the First Common Market, 1860-92)

    Sert Kapak
    The British experience of founding and then distancing itself from the first common market in the Victorian age is barely remembered while the second is being established. But there are many resonances with the modern European experience, in particular, membership of the European Monetary Union., The British experience of founding and then distancing itself from the first common market in the Victorian age is barely remembered while the second is being established. But there are many resonances with the modern European experience, in particular, membership of the European Monetary Union., Peter Marsh is the author of "Joseph Chamberlin: Entrepreneur in Politics".
    140,14  TL182,00  TL