Renaissance

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  • The Clothing of the Renaissance World: Europe - Asia - Africa - The Americas

    Sert Kapak
    A tour de force of scholarship and book production: an essential reference for anyone interested in costume history, Renaissance studies, theater, and ethnography. The Venetian Cesare Vecellio’s two books on the costumes of the known world were hugely popular and influential in their time, and their lively descriptions and vivid illustrations have captivated readers ever since. This is the first time that the entire first edition of 1590, along with the New World section from the 1598 second edition, have been translated and published with their original woodcuts. Here we rediscover the world as seen in the sixteenth century. Beginning with the dress of the inhabitants of Venice—from the grandest doge to the humblest porter—Vecellio’s project quickly grew to include all of Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Like his contemporaries, Vecellio assumed that clothing acted as an identifier of rank, yet he also realized, in a very modern way, that fashion was constantly changing, crossing borders, and transforming the way people lived. All the woodcuts are reproduced full size and accompanied by Vecellio’s commentaries on each costume. An extensive, illustrated introduction by two of the world’s leading experts on Renaissance literature and culture offers the most thorough context possible, complete with additional color illustrations: portraits and sculptures, maps and cityscapes, and details of textiles. 436 woodcuts and 100 color illustrations
    141,75  TL283,50  TL
  • Revolution at the Gates: Selected Writings of Lenin from 1917 (Essential Zizek)

    Revolution at the Gates: Selected Writings of Lenin from 1917 (Essential Zizek)

    Karton Kapak
    The idea of a Lenin renaissance might well provoke an outburst of sarcastic laughter. Marx is OK, but Lenin? Doesn’t he stand for the big catastrophe which left its mark on the entire twentieth-century?Lenin, however, deserves wider consideration than this, and his writings of 1917 are testament to a formidable political figure. They reveal his ability to grasp the significance of an extraordinary moment in history. Everything is here, from Lenin-the-ingenious-revolutionary-strategist to Lenin-of-the-enacted-utopia. To use Kierkegaard’s phrase, what we can glimpse in these writings is Lenin-in-becoming: not yet Lenin-the-Soviet-institution, but Lenin thrown into an open, contingent situation.In Revolution at the Gates, Slavoj Žižek locates the 1917 writings in their historical context, while his afterword tackles the key question of whether Lenin can be reinvented in our era of “cultural capitalism.” Žižek is convinced that, whatever the discussion—the forthcoming crisis of capitalism, the possibility of a redemptive violence, the falsity of liberal tolerance—Lenin’s time has come again.
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  • The Impact of Humanism: The Renaissance in Europe: A Cultural Enquiry, Volume 1 (Renaissance in Europe series)

    The Impact of Humanism: The Renaissance in Europe: A Cultural Enquiry, Volume 1 (Renaissance in Europe series)

    Sert Kapak
    The Renaissance, both as a concept and a period, continues to generate lively controversy not only among academics but also among the general public. Ever since the publication, in 1860, of Jacob Burckhardt's classic study of the Renaissance in Italy, scholars have disputed the origins of the movement and its subsequent influence on European culture and thought. This sequence of three course texts and two anthologies, published in association with the Open University, explores the Renaissance from the interdisciplinary perspective of history, literature, drama, religion, the history of art, philosophy, music and political thought. It provides students and general readers with an unprecedentedly thorough analysis of this absorbing stage in the development of Western civilization. Taking Burckhardt's The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy as its starting point, this volume seeks to explore the continuing relevance of this seminal study to our understanding of the Renaissance, as well as subjecting it to the criticism of subsequent generations of scholars. A particular concern is the 'revival of antiquity' which Burckhardt saw as one of the definitive features of Renaissance culture. This is explored through a reassessment of the role of humanism, with detailed case studies in music (Josquin Desprez), moral philosophy (Valla, Castiglione, More) and political thought (Machiavelli). This volume is the fist in a series of three specifically designed for the Open University course, The Renaissance in Europe: A Cultural Enquiry.
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  • The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci (Volume 1)

    The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci (Volume 1)

    Karton Kapak
    Volume 1 of 2-volume set. Total of 1,566 extracts reveal full range of Leonardo's versatile genius: his writings on painting, sculpture, architecture, anatomy, mining, inventions, music. Dual Italian-English texts, with 186 plates and faithful reproductions of more than 500 additional drawings.
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  • The Vanishing: Shakespeare, the Subject, and Early Modern Culture

    The Vanishing: Shakespeare, the Subject, and Early Modern Culture

    Karton Kapak
    In The Vanishing Christopher Pye combines psychoanalytic and cultural theory to advance an innovative interpretation of Renaissance history and subjectivity. Locating the emergence of the modern subject in the era’s transition from feudalism to a modern societal state, Pye supports his argument with interpretations of diverse cultural and literary phenomena, including Shakespeare’sHamlet and King Lear, witchcraft and demonism, anatomy theaters, and the paintings of Michelangelo.Pye explores the emergence of the early modern subject in terms of a range of subjectivizing mechanisms tied to the birth of a modern conception of history, one that is structured around a spatial and temporal horizon—a vanishing point. He also discusses the distinctly economic character of early modern subjectivity and how this, too, is implicated in our own modern modes of historical understanding. After explaining how the aims of New Historicist and Foucauldian approaches to the Renaissance are inseparably linked to such a historical conception, Pye demonstrates how the early modern subject can be understood in terms of a Lacanian and Zizekian account of the emerging social sphere. By focusing on the Renaissance as a period of remarkable artistic and cultural production, he is able to illustrate his points with discussions of a number of uniquely fascinating topics—for instance, how demonism was intimately related to a significant shift in law and symbolic order and how there existed at the time a “demonic” preoccupation with certain erotic dimensions of the emergent social subject.Highly sophisticated and elegantly crafted, The Vanishing will be of interest to students of Shakespeare and early modern culture, Renaissance visual art, and cultural and psychoanalytic theory.
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  • Challenges to Authority: The Renaissance in Europe: A Cultural Enquiry, Volume 3 (Renaissance in Europe series)

    Challenges to Authority: The Renaissance in Europe: A Cultural Enquiry, Volume 3 (Renaissance in Europe series)

    The evolution and reception of the Renaissance was mediated by, amongst other influences: the Protestant Reformation; the development of science or natural philosophy; and an interest in witchcraft and demonology. These are evaluated alongside the influence of Montaigne's "Essays".
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  • Leonardo's Legacy: How Da Vinci Reimagined the World

    Leonardo's Legacy: How Da Vinci Reimagined the World

    Sert Kapak
    Revered today as, perhaps, the greatest of Renaissance painters, Leonardo da Vinci was a scientist at heart. The artist who created the Mona Lisa also designed functioning robots and digital computers, constructed flying machines and built the first heart valve. His intuitive and ingenious approach—a new mode of thinking—linked highly diverse areas of inquiry in startling new ways and ushered in a new era.In Leonardo’s Legacy, award-winning science journalist Stefan Klein deciphers the forgotten legacy of this universal genius and persuasively demonstrates that today we have much to learn from Leonardo’s way of thinking. Klein sheds light on the mystery behind Leonardo’s paintings, takes us through the many facets of his fascination with water, and explains the true significance of his dream of flying. It is a unique glimpse into the complex and brilliant mind of this inventor, scientist, and pioneer of a new world view, with profound consequences for our times.
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  • Capitals of Capital: A History of International Financial Centres, 1780-2005

    Capitals of Capital: A History of International Financial Centres, 1780-2005

    Sert Kapak
    This is the first history of international financial centres and of the major stake that they now represent in the global economy. Youssef Cassis, one of the world's leading financial historians, provides a fascinating comparative history of the most important centres that constitute the capitals of capital - New York, London, Frankfurt, Paris, Zurich, Amsterdam, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Singapore. The book explores the dynamics of the rise and decline of these great centres from the beginning of the industrial age up to the present, setting them in their economic, political, social and cultural context and drawing on concepts from financial economics in its analysis of events. This paperback edition has been fully updated to take account of the challenges posed by the financial collapse of 2007-8 and offers the longer-term framework necessary to understand the crisis gripping capitals of capital today.
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  • Interpreting the Renaissance: Princes, Cities, Architects (Harvard University Graduate School of Design)

    Interpreting the Renaissance: Princes, Cities, Architects (Harvard University Graduate School of Design)

    Sert Kapak
    Manfredo Tafuri (1935–1994) is acknowledged as one of Italy’s most influential architectural historians. In his final work, Interpreting the Renaissance, published here in English for the first time (the Italian edition, Ricerca del Rinascimento, appeared in 1992), Tafuri analyzes Renaissance architecture from a variety of perspectives, exploring questions that occupied him for over thirty years. What theoretical terms were used to describe the humanist analogy between architecture and language? Is it possible to identify the political motivations behind the period’s new urban strategies? And how does humanism embody both an attachment to tradition and an urge to experiment?Tafuri studies the theory and practice of Renaissance architecture, offering new and compelling readings of its various social, intellectual and cultural contexts, while providing a broad understanding of uses of representation that shaped the entire era. He synthesizes the history of architectural ideas and projects through discussions of the great centers of architectural innovation in Italy (Florence, Rome, and Venice), key patrons from the middle of the fifteenth century (Pope Nicholas V) to the early sixteenth century (Pope Leo X), and crucial figures such as Leon Battista Alberti, Filippo Brunelleschi, Lorenzo de’ Medici, Raphael, Baldassare Castiglione, and Giulio Romano.A magnum opus by one of Europe’s finest scholars, Interpreting the Renaissance is an essential book for anyone interested in the architecture and culture of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Italy.
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  • Reading Revolution: The Politics of Reading in Early Modern England

    Reading Revolution: The Politics of Reading in Early Modern England

    Sert Kapak
    This fascinating book - the first comprehensive study of reading and politics in early modern England - examines how texts of that period were produced and disseminated and how readers interpreted and were influenced by them. Based on the voluminous reading notes of one gentleman, Sir William Drake, the book shows how readers formed radical social values and political ideas as they experienced civil war, revolution, republic and restoration. By analysing the strategies of Drake's reading practices, as well as those of several key contemporaries (including Jonson, Milton, and Clarendon), Kevin Sharpe demonstrates how reading in the rhetorical culture of Renaissance England was a political act. He explains how Drake, for example, by reading and rereading classical and humanist works of Tacitus, Machiavelli, Guicciardini, and Bacon, became the advocate of dissimulation, intrigue, and realpolitik. Authority, Sharpe argues, was experienced, reviewed and criticized not only in the public forum but in the study, on the page and in the imagination of early modern readers.
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  • The Politics of Disclosure, 1674-1725: Secret History Narratives (Political and Popular Culture in the Early Modern Period)

    The Politics of Disclosure, 1674-1725: Secret History Narratives (Political and Popular Culture in the Early Modern Period)

    Sert Kapak
    This is a study of the 'secret history', a polemical form of historiography which flourished in England during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Secret histories promised their readers previously undiscovered intelligence about the covert actions and hidden motives of public figures, primarily monarchs, their ministers and their mistresses. In an era of absolute rule, secret histories shattered the aura of mystery which surrounded the power elite. The secret history spread through the genres and was used by polemicists, pamphleteers and novelists from across the political spectrum. Bullard argues that secret histories' rhetorical peculiarities must be understood in the light of contemporary party politics. As a form, they indicate a sophisticated, analytical and politically engaged reading public in late Stuart and early Hanoverian England.
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  • University and College Libraries of Cambridge: Corpus of British Medieval Library Catalogues, Volume 10 (British Library - Corpus of British Medieval

    University and College Libraries of Cambridge: Corpus of British Medieval Library Catalogues, Volume 10 (British Library - Corpus of British Medieval

    Sert Kapak
    The medieval university at Cambridge was a centre for the circulation of books. In complicated networks of acquisition and exchange, books were bought, borrowed, copied, and bequeathed. Colleges came to own collections of books for the use of their fellows, and in the late middle ages many colleges built library-rooms to house their books. Some colleges, notably Peterhouse, Gonville and Caius, and Pembroke, still retain large parts of their medieval collections. This volume collects for the first time all the medieval documents that refer to library holdings in both the medieval university and its colleges, documents as various as borrowing registers, inventories, and formal catalogues of various dates and degrees of sophistication. Also included is a substantial biographical section on individuals who gave or bequeathed books to Cambridge libraries, and where a will survives it is included as a document.
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  • Italian Architecture from Michelangelo to Borromini (World of Art)

    Italian Architecture from Michelangelo to Borromini (World of Art)

    Karton Kapak
    The years between 1520 and 1630 in Italy are among the most crucial periods in the history of architecture, but it is a story that has never been fully told. Conventionally, the classic age of the High Renaissance ends with Michelangelo; Baroque begins with the generation of Borromini and Bernini; and in between comes 'Mannerism', a style only invented in the 20th century and never convincingly defined. Andrew Hopkins breaks new ground by showing that this was a century of experiment, diversity and bold initiatives that cannot be expressed by a single label. It includes famous names - Palladio, Vignola, Sansovino, Scamozzi, Longhena - but also many others who were equally brilliant but are relatively unknown. The situation was complicated by reigional traditions, functional demands, the tastes of patrons and the personalities of the architects, but Dr Hopkins is able to make all clear and comprehensive. This is now the definitive book on one of the turning-points of European architecture
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  • The Cambridge Introduction to Early English Theatre

    The Cambridge Introduction to Early English Theatre

    Karton Kapak
    This 2006 introduction offers an overview of early English theatre from the earliest recorded vernacular texts in the late medieval period to the closing of the theatres in 1642. Where most existing studies focus on one side or the other of an imaginary boundary between 'medieval' and 'early modern' or 'Renaissance' drama, this book examines the theatre of nearly three centuries in a way that highlights continuities as well as divisions. The study is organised into five subject-based chapters: Place and space; Actors and audiences; Writers, controllers and critics; Genre and tradition; Instruction and spectacle. It includes full chronologies, helpful text boxes and over twenty illustrations.
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  • Amerigo: Die Geschichte eines historischen Irrtums

    Amerigo: Die Geschichte eines historischen Irrtums

    Karton Kapak
    Eine »kleine Studie über das Vespucci-Problem« nannte Stefan Zweig diesen didaktisch angelegten Essay, der zuerst 1944 posthum mit dem Untertitel ›Geschichte eines historischen lrrtums‹ erschien. Diese Untersuchung, wie es zur Benennung Amerikas nach dem Vornamen eines Mannes kam, der mit der eigentlichen Entdeckung gar nichts zu tun hatte, gehört, trotz ihres schmalen Umfangs, in die Reihe von Stefan Zweigs »histoires racontées«, seiner großen Zeit- und Geschichtsdarstellungen. Der italienische Seefahrer Amerigo Vespucci (1451–1512) deckte mit seiner Erkenntnis eines anderen, des neuen Erdteils lediglich Christoph Columbus' Irrtum auf, er habe den kürzesten Seeweg nach Indien gefunden. Für die Namensgebung aber ist er durchaus nicht verantwortlich – die erfolgte, ohne sein Wissen und Zutun, 1507 durch den Kartographen Martin Waldseemüller in der ›Cosmographiae introductio‹, der Einführung in die Kosmographie. Dort heißt es, da Americus - eine eigenwillig latinisierte Form von Amerigo! - den vierten Erdteil als solchen erkannt habe, könne man ihn Americus oder - da alle Erdteile weiblich bezeichnet werden - America nennen. Dies also ist »der eigentliche Taufschein Amerikas«, und so hat für lange Zeit der Namenspatron Amerigo Vespucci ungerechtfertigterweise als der Entdecker der Neuen Welt gegolten...
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