Medical Books

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  • My Teaching

    Karton Kapak
    Bringing together three previously unpublished lectures presented to the public by Lacan at the height of his career, 'My Teaching' is a clear, concise introduction to the thought of the influential psychoanalyst. Drawing on examples from popular culture and common sense, this lively book explores a range of Lacan's most important ideas, including his debt to Freud, linguistic unconsciousness and sexuality in its relation to psychoanalytic truth. Engaging, witty and personal, 'My Teaching' offers a rare opportunity to engage directly with Lacan's own general explanation of his teaching to a non-psychoanalytic audience.
    15,76  TL38,44  TL
  • Cancer: A Very Short Introduction

    Karton Kapak
    Every year around 10 million people are diagnosed with cancer, around 80% of whom are destined to die from the disease, accounting for 1 in 6 of all deaths worldwide. And while research into cancer is bringing huge improvements in the range of options available to cancer patients, these new therapies bring with them massive challenges for healthcare systems struggling to find the huge sums of money for the large numbers of patients involved. This Very Short Introduction explores the facts underlying these figures, starting with the basic facts about the disease before moving on to the bigger picture of the economics and politics of cancer care. Nick James, founder of the CancerHelp UK website, examines the trends in diagnosis of the disease and the constant improvements in treatment techniques that result in better cure rates and increased quality and quantity of life for cancer patients. The book also considers issues surrounding expensive drug development, highlights what can be done to reduce the risk of developing cancer, and discusses the use of complementary and alternative therapies.
    12,39  TL25,81  TL
  • Neither Brain nor Ghost: A Nondualist Alternative to the Mind-Brain Identity Theory

    Sert Kapak
    In this highly original work, Teed Rockwell rejects both dualism and the mind-brain identity theory. He proposes instead that mental phenomena emerge not merely from brain activity but from an interacting nexus of brain, body, and world. The mind can be seen not as an organ within the body, but as a "behavioral field" that fluctuates within this brain-body-world nexus. If we reject the dominant form of the mind-brain identity theory -- which Rockwell calls "Cartesian materialism" (distinct from Daniel Dennett's concept of the same name) -- and accept this new alternative, then many philosophical and scientific problems can be solved. Other philosophers have flirted with these ideas, including Dewey, Heidegger, Putnam, Millikan, and Dennett. But Rockwell goes further than these tentative speculations and offers a detailed alternative to the dominant philosophical view, applying pragmatist insights to contemporary scientific and philosophical problems.Rockwell shows that neuroscience no longer supports the mind-brain identity theory because the brain cannot be isolated from the rest of the nervous system; moreover, there is evidence that the mind is hormonal as well as neural. These data, and Rockwell's reanalysis of the concept of causality, show why the borders of mental embodiment cannot be neatly drawn at the skull, or even at the skin. Rockwell then demonstrates how his proposed view of the mind can resolve paradoxes engendered by the mind-brain identity theory in such fields as neuroscience, artificial intelligence, epistemology, and philosophy of language. Finally, he argues that understanding the mind as a "behavioral field" supports the new cognitive science paradigm of dynamic systems theory (DST).
    25,27  TL84,24  TL
  • The Red and the Real: An Essay on Color Ontology

    Karton Kapak
    The Red and the Real offers a new approach to longstanding philosophical puzzles about what colors are and how they fit into the natural world. Jonathan Cohen argues for a role-functionalist treatment of color--a view according to which colors are identical to certain functional roles involving perceptual effects on subjects. Cohen first argues (on broadly empirical grounds) for the more general relationalist view that colors are constituted in terms of relations between objects, perceivers, and viewing conditions. He responds to semantic, ontological, and phenomenological objections against this thesis, and argues that relationalism offers the best hope of respecting both empirical results and ordinary belief about color. He then defends the more specific role functionalist-account by contending that the latter is the most plausible form of color relationalism.
    13,34  TL63,54  TL
  • Nature and Mortality: Recollections of a Philosopher in Public Life

    Karton Kapak
    Mary Warnock, a professional philosopher, gives a frank account of where we stand today on such disturbing matters as human embryology, genetic engineering, euthanasia, and abortion. Governments of both parties have long regarded Warnock as an expert on a wide range of issues on the border between ethics and law and she is considered an ideal person to guide and assist experts. Although Warnock's views may be shocking to some, her contribution to the debate is always stimulating. Here, her views on weighty ethical issues are set in the context of her own experience of writing reports on them. The framework of her book is autobiographical and therefore highly personal. Nature and Mortality is Warnock at her most perceptive, wise, and entertaining.
    24,52  TL98,08  TL
  • Semiotics of Programming

    Karton Kapak
    This book provides a semiotic analysis of computer programs along three axes: models of signs, kinds of signs, and systems of signs. Because computer programs are well defined and rigid, applying semiotic theories to them will help to reorganize the semiotic theories themselves. Moreover, semiotic discussion of programming theory can provide possible explanations for why programming has developed as it has and how computation is fundamentally related to human semiosis. The goal of this book is to consider the question of what computers can and cannot do, by analyzing how computer sign systems compare to those of humans. A key concept throughout is reflexivity - the capability of a system or function to reinterpret what it has produced by itself. Sign systems are reflexive by nature, and humans know how to make the most of this characteristic but have not yet fully implemented it into computer systems. Therefore, the limitations of current computers can be ascribed to insufficient reflexivity.
    32,65  TL77,74  TL
  • The Black Flies (Simuliidae) of North America (Comstock books)

    A ROM Publication in ScienceA Comstock Book Published in association with the Royal Ontario MuseumThere is much more to black flies than you can learn in the woods on a warm spring day. This book compiles the authors' previously unpublished research and nearly all of the published information on North American black flies. All aspects of black flies are treated within the context of a worldwide perspective, including natural history and ecology, cytology and morphology, phylogeny and classification, economic impact, pest management, natural enemies, history of research, study methods, and identification. Each of the 254 species known from the continent north of Mexico, including 43 new species, is treated in detail. Each species account summarizes all pertinent information on taxonomy, morphology, cytology, physiology, molecular systematics, and bionomics. The book is copiously illustrated with more than 1,100 figures, including color drawings of larvae and adult thoraxes, by some of the world's foremost scientific illustrators. Additional figures and photographs show chromosomal and morphological features, portraits of important researchers, control efforts, natural enemies, oviposition behavior, and cladograms. Detailed distribution maps show the range of each species.A Comstock Book published in Association with the Royal Ontario Museum
    28,26  TL314,00  TL
  • Action Theory, Rationality and Compulsion (International Perspectives in Philosophy and Psychiatry)

    Karton Kapak
    Rationality and Compulsion presents a unique examination of mental illness - derived from philosophical action theory. Delusion is common to many mental disorders, resulting in actions that, though perhaps rational to the individual, might seem entirely inappropriate or harmful to others. So what is it that causes these actions, and why do they continue? The theory expounded in this book shows how the key to this problem might be compulsion. This book presents a new analysis of the notion of compulsion - developed from action theory. The books starts with an introduction to action theory (for the benefit of non-philosophers) It then shows how insights from action theory can help us better understand mental illness, before developing an analysis of compulsion that emphasizes the element of unavoidability. The book argues that what is fundamentally disturbing to the person suffering from delusion is not so much the fact that the disorder tends to lead to irrational actions but rather the fact that he or she is unable to avoid performing these actions. The individual is or feels compelled to act in the way he or she does. The book contains some concrete illustrations of this idea as applied to several psychiatric diagnoses, such as paranoia, phobia, and psychopathy. Rationality and Compulsion is a highly original new work from a leading figure in the philosophy and psychiatry movement. It will advance our understanding of mental illness, and be valuable for psychiatrists, psychologists, as well as philosophers.
    32,27  TL140,29  TL
  • Being There: Putting Brain, Body, and World Together Again

    Karton Kapak
    Brain, body, and world are united in a complex dance of circular causation and extended computational activity. In Being There, Andy Clark weaves these several threads into a pleasing whole and goes on to address foundational questions concerning the new tools and techniques needed to make sense of the emerging sciences of the embodied mind. Clark brings together ideas and techniques from robotics, neuroscience, infant psychology, and artificial intelligence. He addresses a broad range of adaptive behaviors, from cockroach locomotion to the role of linguistic artifacts in higher-level thought.
    32,27  TL73,33  TL
  • Building Virtual Communities: Learning and Change in Cyberspace (Learning in Doing: Social, Cognitive and Computational Perspectives)

    Karton Kapak
    This study examines how learning and cognitive change are fostered by online communities. The chapters provide a basis for thinking about the dynamics of Internet community building. They consider the role of the self or individual as a participant in virtual community, and the design and refinement of technology as the conduit for extending and enhancing the possibilities of community building in cyberspace. The volume will interest educators, psychologists, sociologists, and researchers in human-computer interaction.
    37,20  TL90,72  TL
  • Critical Race Realism: Intersections of Psychology, Race, and Law

    Karton Kapak
    A new way of looking at our legal system—focused on the nexus of social science, race, and the law—that takes the field of critical legal studies into the twenty-first century."The introduction of new methods in the social sciences to the law promises to revolutionize how legal scholars approach the study of race."—Jeffrey Rachlinski, professor at Cornell Law SchoolBuilding on the field of critical race theory, which took a theoretical approach to questions of race and the law, Critical Race Realism offers a practical look at the way racial bias plays out at every level of the legal system, from witness identification and jury selection to prosecutorial behavior, defense decisions, and the way expert witnesses are regarded.Using cutting-edge research from across the social sciences and, in particular, new understandings from psychology of the way prejudice functions in the brain, this new book—the first overview of the topic—includes many of the seminal writings to date along with newly commissioned pieces filling in gaps in the literature. The authors are part of a rising generation of legal scholars and social scientists intent on using the latest insights from their respective fields to understand the racial biases built into our legal system and to offer concrete measures to overcome them.Topics include:• race and juries• race and the perceived credibility of expert witnesses• the psychology of cross-racial eyewitness testimony• prejudice in police profiling• stereotyping and capital-sentencing outcomes• race and judicial decision-making• race and parental rights termination
    9,06  TL90,60  TL
  • Genetics and Criminal Behavior (Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Public Policy)

    Karton Kapak
    This volume brings together a group of essays by leading philosophers of science, ethicists, and legal scholars, commissioned for an important and controversial conference on genetics and crime. The essays address basic conceptual, methodological, and ethical issues raised by genetic research on criminal behavior but largely ignored in the public debate. They explore the complexities in tracing any genetic influence on criminal, violent, or antisocial behavior, the varieties of interpretation to which evidence of such influences is subject, and the relevance of such influences to the moral and legal appraisal of criminal conduct. The volume provides a critical overview of the assumptions, methods, and findings of recent behavioral genetics.
    32,31  TL95,04  TL
  • How the Mind Explains Behavior: Folk Explanations, Meaning, and Social Interaction (A Bradford Book)

    Sert Kapak
    In this provocative monograph, Bertram Malle describes behavior explanations as having a dual nature -- as being both cognitive and social acts -- and proposes a comprehensive theoretical model that integrates the two aspects. When people try to understand puzzling human behavior, they construct behavior explanations, which are a fundamental tool of social cognition. But, Malle argues, behavior explanations exist not only in the mind; they are also overt verbal actions used for social purposes. When people explain their own behavior or the behavior of others, they are using the explanation to manage a social interaction -- by offering clarification, trying to save face, or casting blame. Malle's account makes clear why these two aspects of behavior explanation exist and why they are closely linked; along the way, he illustrates the astonishingly sophisticated and subtle patterns of folk behavior explanations.Malle begins by reviewing traditional attribution theories and their simplified portrayal of behavior explanation. A more realistic portrayal, he argues, must be grounded in the nature, function, and origins of the folk theory of mind -- the conceptual framework underlying people's grasp of human behavior and its connection to the mind. Malle then presents a theory of behavior explanations, focusing first on their conceptual structure and then on their psychological construction. He applies this folk-conceptual theory to a number of questions, including the communicative functions of behavior explanations, and the differences in explanations given for self and others as well as for individuals and groups. Finally, he highlights the strengths of the folk-conceptual theory of explanation over traditional attribution theory and points to future research applications.
    37,20  TL88,56  TL
  • Power and the Self (Publications of the Society for Psychological Anthropology)

    Karton Kapak
    This edited volume deals with an important but neglected topic--the ways in which power is experienced by individuals, as agents as well as objects of the exercise of power. Each contributor presents a series of case studies drawn from a variety of cultural contexts. These include a chapter on the treatment of patients in American nursing homes, the plight of immigrant Turkish women in the Netherlands, and one contribution that relates theories about the capacity to commit genocidal violence to "everyday forms of violence".
    17,28  TL86,38  TL
  • Practical Geriatric Oncology (Cambridge Medicine)

    Sert Kapak
    The risk of cancer increases with age, and the number of older adults seeking treatment is increasing dramatically in line with the aging population. The care of older patients differs from that of younger adults because of differences in the biology of the tumor, age-related differences in host physiology, comorbidity burden and psychosocial issues, which might im pact the efficacy and side effects of cancer therapy. Practical Geriatric Oncology is a comprehensive, evidence-based text that synthesizes the growing literature in this field and provides practical guidelines to the care of older adults with cancer. Coverage includes patient assessment, management of solid tumors and hematologic malignancies, the impact of age on the pharmacology of cancer therapy, surgical oncology and radiation oncology in the older adult, symptom management, and supportive care. In addition to serving as core reading for oncologists and hematologists, the book will also be a useful work for other healthcare professionals who provide oncology care, including surgeons, radiation oncologists, palliative care doctors, primary care providers, geriatricians, and nurses.
    30,46  TL304,56  TL
  • Slow Cures and Bad Philosophers: Essays on Wittgenstein, Medicine, and Bioethics

    Karton Kapak
    Slow Cures and Bad Philosophers uses insights from the philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein to rethink bioethics. Although Wittgenstein produced little formal writing on ethics, this volume shows that, in fact, ethical issues permeate the entirety of his work. The scholars whom Carl Elliott has assembled in this volume pay particular attention to Wittgenstein’s concern with the thick context of moral problems, his suspicion of theory, and his belief in description as the real aim of philosophy. Their aim is not to examine Wittgenstein’s personal moral convictions but rather to explore how a deep engagement with his work can illuminate some of the problems that medicine and biological science present. As Elliott explains in his introduction, Wittgenstein’s philosophy runs against the grain of most contemporary bioethics scholarship, which all too often ignores the context in which moral problems are situated and pays little attention to narrative, ethnography, and clinical case studies in rendering bioethical judgments. Such anonymous, impersonal, rule-writing directives in which health care workers are advised how to behave is what this volume intends to counteract. Instead, contributors stress the value of focusing on the concrete particulars of moral problems and write in the spirit of Wittgenstein’s belief that philosophy should be useful. Specific topics include the concept of “good dying,” the nature of clinical decision making, the treatment of neurologically damaged patients, the moral treatment of animals, and the challenges of moral particularism. Inspired by a philosopher who deplored “professional philosophy,” this work brings some startling insights and clarifications to contemporary ethical problems posed by the realities of modern medicine.Contributors. Larry Churchill, David DeGrazia, Cora Diamond, James Edwards, Carl Elliott, Grant Gillett, Paul Johnston, Margaret Olivia Little, James Lindemann Nelson, Knut Erik Tranoy
    14,87  TL49,57  TL