Astronomy & Space Science

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  • The Fallen Sky: An Intimate History of Shooting Stars

    Sert Kapak
    In this acclaimed volume, prizewinning poet and nature writer Christopher Cokinos takes us on an epic journey from Antarctica to outer space, weaving together natural history, memoir, and in-depth profiles of amateur researchers, rogue scientists, and stargazing dreamers to tell the riveting tale of how the study of meteorites became a modern science.
    27,06  TL66,00  TL
  • A Question and Answer Guide to Astronomy

    Karton Kapak
    Are we alone in the Universe? Was there anything before the Big Bang? Are there other universes? What are sunspots? What is a shooting star? Was there ever life on Mars? This book answers the fascinating questions that we have been asking ourselves for hundreds of years. Using non-technical language, the authors summarize current astronomical knowledge, taking care to include the important underlying scientific principles. Plentiful color illustrations, graphs and photographs lend further weight to their simple yet meticulously written explanations. An extensive bibliography allows you to pursue or recap on the subjects that rouse your particular interest. Dip in to discover and learn fascinating facts about our Solar System and the Universe beyond!
    34,98  TL64,78  TL
  • Cambridge Dictionary of Astronomy

    Karton Kapak
    Held up by the heliopause? Floored by the flatness problem? Intimidated by MACHOs? With the Cambridge Astronomy Dictionary you'll no longer be defeated by such astronomical jargon! These and 3,200 additional words, names, and abbreviations used in amateur and professional astronomy, are clearly and concisely defined. Entries include information from modern and classical astronomy, including: A comprehensive selection of specialist terms All the constellations, planets, and moons of the solar system Comets, stars, asteroids, nebulae, and galaxies Telescopes, observatories, spacecraft, and space missions Published internationally as The Penguin Dictionary of Astronomy, it is considered the classic reference work in its field. This edition has been completely revised and includes many new entries. Anyone involved with astronomy, either professionally or as a hobby, will find the Cambridge Astronomy Dictionary a handy and invaluable reference. Jacqueline Mitton's interest in astronomy began when she was a child and she had her first telescope as a teenager. She graduated from the University of Oxford with a degree in physics, then obtained her PhD in astronomy at the University of Cambridge. In 1989 she became the Press Officer of the Royal Astronomical Society. She is a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, a member of the International Astronomical Union, and a Member of the Division of Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society. She is the author or co-author of 16 astronomy books and writes for both children and adults.
    31,84  TL117,94  TL
  • Zodiac Stained Glass Pattern Book (Dover Stained Glass Instruction)

    Karton Kapak
    Inspired by astrology's sun signs, these original designs offer stained glass artists a treasury of imaginative patterns. In addition to several different patterns for each of the twelve individual signs, this collection includes a variety of designs that spotlight the entire wheel of the zodiac. Perfect for windows, suncatchers, and other glass crafts, these designs work equally well as graphics for print, textile, needlework, and other craft projects. Sixteen pages of color photographs present vivid images of the finished projects.
    24,96  TL29,37  TL
  • Chasing the Sun (The Epic Story of the Star That Gives Us Life)

    Sert Kapak
    Adazzling tour d'horizonof mankind's enduring fascination with, and reliance upon, the extraordinary star at the centre of our solar system., The Sun is so powerful, so much bigger than us, that it is a terrifying subject. Yet though we depend on it, we take it for granted. Amazingly the first book of its kind, CHASING THE SUNis a cultural and scientific history of our relationship with the star that gives us life. Richard Cohen, applying the same mix of wide-ranging reference and intimate detail that won outstanding reviews for By the Sword, travels from the ancient Greek astronomers to modern-day solar scientists, from Stonehenge to Antarctica (site of the solar eclipse of 2003, when penguins were said to sing), Mexico's Aztecs to the Norwegian city of Tromso, where for two months of the year there is no Sun at all. He introduces us to the crucial 'sunspot cycle' in modern economics, the religious dances of Indian tribesmen, the histories of sundials and calendars, the plight of migrating birds, the latest theories of global warming, and Galileo recording his discoveries in code, for fear of persecution. And throughout, there is the rich Sun literature -- from the writings of Homer through Dante and Nietzsche to Keats, Shelley and beyond. Blindingly impressive and hugely readable, this is a tour de force of narrative non-fiction., Richard Cohen is a nationally syndicated columnist for The Washington Post, where he has covered national politics and foreign affairs since 1976. He has written for numerous publications, including The New Republic, The Nation, Esquire GQ, and The New York Review of Books. He has received the Sigma Delta Chi and Washington-Baltimore Newspaper Guild Awards for his investigative reporting.
    13,43  TL134,29  TL
  • Uncentering The Earth (Copernicus and the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres)

    Sert Kapak
    The man and the idea that created modern science, as seen by one of today's most celebrated writers., In 1543, the Polish astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus lay on his deathbed, his just-published masterpiece On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres in his hands. At that time, religious doctrine and common sense dictated that the earth ruled the universe, with the sun, moon, planets, and stars all rotating around it. By putting the sun at the center of that cosmology, his book fomented another kind of revolution-a scientific one-that would lead to a completely new view of the universe, and humanity's place in it. As contemporary cosmologists explore the universe's vastness and the nearly insignificant role we play in it, the repercussions from Copernicus's radical step continue to resound. With the energetic prose and powerful intelligence for which he is known, William T. Vollmann provides an enlightening and readable explication not only of Copernicus's book but also of Copernicus's epoch, and the momentous clash between the two., William T. Vollmann is the author of several works of fiction, including The Atlas and The Rainbow Stories, and has contributed stories and journalism to many publications. He lives in California., Critically acclaimed author - Vollmann's 3,000 page RISING UP, RISING DOWN was hailed by Zembla magazine as possibly 'the most ambitious literary project ever' and nominated for the National Book Critics' Circle Award Part of the Great Discoveries series
    23,50  TL47,00  TL
  • Meteors and Meteorites: Origins and Observations

    Meteors and Meteorites: Origins and Observations

    Karton Kapak
    The earth is bombarded both day and night by meteoroids and meteorites. These wayward bodies—small fragments derived from aging comets and the collisions between asteroids—are observed in the Earth’s upper atmosphere as meteors and brilliant fireballs. Written with the amateur astronomer in mind, this book includes step-by-step guidance on visual observation and analyzing data, practical projects that demonstrate how the observer can gather scientifically useful data, and instructions on how to identify and photograph meteor trails.
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  • Galileo

    Galileo

    Karton Kapak
    Considered by many to be one of Brecht's masterpieces, Galileo explores the question of a scientist's social and ethical responsibility, as the brilliant Galileo must choose between his life and his life's work when confronted with the demands of the Inquisition. Through the dramatic characterization of the famous physicist, Brecht examines the issues of scientific morality and the difficult relationship between the intellectual and authority. This version of the play is the famous one that was brought to completion by Brecht himself, working with Charles Laughton, who played Galileo in the first two American productions (Hollywood and New York, 1947). Since then the play has become a classic in the world repertoire. "The play which most strongly stamped on my mind a sense of Brecht's great stature as an artist of the modern theatre was Galileo." - Harold Clurman; "Thoughtful and profoundly sensitive." - Newsweek.
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  • The Earth Moves: Galileo and the Roman Inquisition (Great Discoveries)

    The Earth Moves: Galileo and the Roman Inquisition (Great Discoveries)

    Sert Kapak
    A cogent portrayal of the beginnings of modern science and a turning point in the evolution of the freedom of thought.Celebrated, controversial, condemned, Galileo Galilei is a seminal figure in the history of science. Both Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein credit him as the first modern scientist. His 1633 trial before the Holy Office of the Inquisition is the prime drama in the history of the conflict between science and religion. In Galileo’s day, Rome was the capital of a sovereign theocratic power, which in 1600 had executed Giordano Bruno on similar charges and reserved the right to torture Galileo. Galileo was then sixty-nine years old and the most venerated scientist in Italy. Although subscribing to an anti-literalist view of the Bible, as per Saint Augustine, Galileo considered himself a believing Catholic. Playing to his own strengths—a deep knowledge of Italy, a longstanding interest in Renaissance and Baroque lore—Dan Hofstadter explains apparent paradoxes and limns this historic moment in the widest cultural context, portraying Galileo as both humanist and scientist.
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  • A More Perfect Heaven: How Copernicus Revolutionized the Cosmos

    A More Perfect Heaven: How Copernicus Revolutionized the Cosmos

    By 1514, the reclusive cleric Nicolaus Copernicus had written and hand-copied an initial outline of his heliocentric theory-in which he defied common sense and received wisdom to place the sun, not the earth, at the center of our universe, and set the earth spinning among the other planets. Over the next two decades, Copernicus expanded his theory through hundreds of observations, while compiling in secret a book-length manuscript that tantalized mathematicians and scientists throughout Europe. For fear of ridicule, he refused to publish.In 1539, a young German mathematician, Georg Joachim Rheticus, drawn by rumors of a revolution to rival the religious upheaval of Martin Luther's Reformation, traveled to Poland to seek out Copernicus. Two years later, the Protestant youth took leave of his aging Catholic mentor and arranged to have Copernicus's manuscript published, in 1543, as De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres)-the book that forever changed humankind's place in the universe.In her elegant, compelling style, Dava Sobel chronicles, as nobody has, the conflicting personalities and extraordinary discoveries that shaped the Copernican Revolution. At the heart of the book is her play And the Sun Stood Still, imagining Rheticus's struggle to convince Copernicus to let his manuscript see the light of day. As she achieved with her bestsellers Longitude and Galileo's Daughter, Sobel expands the bounds of narration, giving us an unforgettable portrait of scientific achievement, and of the ever-present tensions between science and faith.
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  • Empire of the Stars: Obsession, Friendship, and Betrayal in the Quest for Black Holes

    Empire of the Stars: Obsession, Friendship, and Betrayal in the Quest for Black Holes

    Sert Kapak
    In August 1930, on a voyage from Madras to London, a young Indian looked up at the stars and contemplated their fate. Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar--Chandra, as he was called--calculated that certain stars would suffer a strange and violent death, collapsing to virtually nothing. This extraordinary claim, the first mathematical description of black holes, brought Chandra into direct conflict with Sir Arthur Eddington, one of the greatest astrophysicists of the day. Eddington ridiculed the young man's idea at a meeting of the Royal Astronomy Society in 1935, sending Chandra into an intellectual and emotional tailspin--and hindering the progress of astrophysics for nearly forty years. Empire of the Stars is the dramatic story of this intellectual debate and its implications for twentieth-century science. Arthur I. Miller traces the idea of black holes from early notions of "dark stars" to the modern concepts of wormholes, quantum foam, and baby universes. In the process, he follows the rise of two great theories--relativity and quantum mechanics--that meet head on in black holes. Empire of the Stars provides a unique window into the remarkable quest to understand how stars are born, how they live, and, most portentously (for their fate is ultimately our own), how they die. It is also the moving tale of one man's struggle against the establishment--an episode that sheds light on what science is, how it works, and where it can go wrong. Miller exposes the deep-seated prejudices that plague even the most rational minds. Indeed, it took the nuclear arms race to persuade scientists to revisit Chandra's work from the 1930s, for the core of a hydrogen bomb resembles nothing so much as an exploding star. Only then did physicists realize the relevance, truth, and importance of Chandra's work, which was finally awarded a Nobel Prize in 1983. Set against the waning days of the British Empire and taking us right up to the present, this sweeping history examines the quest to understand one of the most forbidding phenomena in the universe, as well as the passions that fueled that quest over the course of a century.
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  • Visions of the Cosmos

    Visions of the Cosmos

    This spectacularly illustrated book is a comprehensive exploration of astronomy through the eyes of the world's observatories and spacecraft missions. Featuring the latest and most stunning images, it provides a magnificent picture of the beauty of the cosmos. The accompanying text is an accessible guide to the science behind the wonders and includes clear explanations of all the major themes in astronomy. An essential guide to understanding and appreciating the Universe, Visions of the Cosmos builds on the success of the authors' previous book, Hubble Vision, which became an international best-seller and won world-wide acclaim. Carolyn Collins Petersen is a science journalist and creator of educational materials for astronomy. She is the former Editor of Books & Products at Sky Publishing Corporation, and served as Editor of SkyWatch and Associate Editor of Sky & Telescope magazines. Petersen is the lead author of the book Hubble Vision, first published in 1995 by Cambridge University Press, and co-written with Dr. John C. Brandt. She is also co-editor (with J. Kelly Beatty and Andrew Chaikin) of The New Solar System, fourth edition, co-published by Sky Publishing Corporation and Cambridge University Press. John C. Brandt has held positions as a research scientist, teacher, and administrator, and is currently an adjunct professor of physics and astronomy at the University of New Mexico. He served for 20 years as Chief of a major NASA scientific laboratory and was the Principal Inverstigator for the Goddard High Resolution Spectograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. John received the NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement in 1978 and 1992, and has had a minor planet formally named after him (3503 Brandt) for his fundamental contributions to understanding of solar system astrophysics.
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  • Looking for Life, Searching the Solar System

    Looking for Life, Searching the Solar System

    Sert Kapak
    How did life begin on Earth? Is it confined to our planet? Will humans one day be able to travel long distances in space in search of other life forms? Written by three experts in the space arena, Looking for Life, Searching the Solar System aims to answer these and other intriguing questions. Beginning with what we understand of life on Earth, it describes the latest ideas about the chemical basis of life as we know it, and how they are influencing strategies to search for life elsewhere. It considers the ability of life, from microbes to humans, to survive in space, on the surface of other planets, and be transported from one planet to another. It looks at the latest plans for missions to search for life in the Solar System, and how these are being influenced by new technologies, and current thinking about life on Earth. This fascinating and broad-ranging book is for anyone with an interest in the search for life beyond our planet.
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