Wittgenstein's Private Language (Grammar, Nonsense and Imagination in Philosophical Investigations, 243-315)

Wittgenstein's Private Language (Grammar, Nonsense and Imagination in Philosophical Investigations, 243-315)

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Presents a critical commentary on sections 243-315 of Wittgenstein's "Philosophical Investigations": the famous remarks on 'private language'. This book aims to elucidate Wittgenstein's philosophical method, and to establish the importance of the form or style of his writing to the proper application of this method., Stephen Mulhall presents a detailed critical commentary on sections 243-315 of Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations: the famous remarks on 'private language'. In so doing, he makes detailed use of Stanley Cavell's interpretations of these remarks; and relates disputes about how to interpret this aspect of Wittgenstein's later philosophy to a recent, highly influential controversy about how to interpret Wittgenstein's early text, the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, by drawing and testing out a distinction between resolute and substantial understandings of the related notions of grammar, nonsense and the imagination. The book is concerned throughout to elucidate Wittgenstein's philosophical method, and to establish the importance of the form or style of his writing to the proper application of this method., Introduction: Wittgenstein's Aesthetics of Austerity; 1. Wittgenstein's Monologuists (section 243); 2. A Child is Crying (sections 244-5); 3. Wittgenstein's Cloud: Of Unknowing (section 246); 4. Privacy, Patience and Pictures: First Methodological Interlude (sections 248, 251-2); 5. Cavell's Corsican Brothers (section 253); 6. Wittgenstein's Semi-Colon: Second Methodological Interlude (sect 255); 7. Wittgenstein's Diarist: Three Readings (section 258); 8. Excursus: Cavell's Mezuzah; 9. Wittgenstein's Gift (Of Grammatical Imagination): Pots and Dolls, Stones and Flies (sections 268-9); 10. The Human Manometer (section 270); Coda: Wittgenstein's Beetle (section 293), ...genuinely thought-provoking...Mulhall subverts ingrained readings of the text, challenging the reader to re-examine features of Wittgenstein's work she may have, unwisely taken for granted. Genia Schonbaumsfeld MIND This is an extremely important book, written in a style at once subtle and nuanced as well as strikingly compelling Steven Hall Philosophical Investigations 31.3 July 08 it is hard to imagine a more subtle, searching or sensitive exploration of Wittgenstein's remarks on private language Quassim Cassam, Times Literary Supplement many-layered, stimulating, and often illuminating Charles Crittenden, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

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